The Party eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 210 pages of information about The Party.

Olga Mihalovna was sitting on the nearest side of the hurdle near the shanty.  The sun was hidden behind the clouds.  The trees and the air were overcast as before rain, but in spite of that it was hot and stifling.  The hay cut under the trees on the previous day was lying ungathered, looking melancholy, with here and there a patch of colour from the faded flowers, and from it came a heavy, sickly scent.  It was still.  The other side of the hurdle there was a monotonous hum of bees. . . .

Suddenly she heard footsteps and voices; some one was coming along the path towards the beehouse.

“How stifling it is!” said a feminine voice.  “What do you think—­ is it going to rain, or not?”

“It is going to rain, my charmer, but not before night,” a very familiar male voice answered languidly.  “There will be a good rain.”

Olga Mihalovna calculated that if she made haste to hide in the shanty they would pass by without seeing her, and she would not have to talk and to force herself to smile.  She picked up her skirts, bent down and crept into the shanty.  At once she felt upon her face, her neck, her arms, the hot air as heavy as steam.  If it had not been for the stuffiness and the close smell of rye bread, fennel, and brushwood, which prevented her from breathing freely, it would have been delightful to hide from her visitors here under the thatched roof in the dusk, and to think about the little creature.  It was cosy and quiet.

“What a pretty spot!” said a feminine voice.  “Let us sit here, Pyotr Dmitritch.”

Olga Mihalovna began peeping through a crack between two branches.  She saw her husband, Pyotr Dmitritch, and Lubotchka Sheller, a girl of seventeen who had not long left boarding-school.  Pyotr Dmitritch, with his hat on the back of his head, languid and indolent from having drunk so much at dinner, slouched by the hurdle and raked the hay into a heap with his foot; Lubotchka, pink with the heat and pretty as ever, stood with her hands behind her, watching the lazy movements of his big handsome person.

Olga Mihalovna knew that her husband was attractive to women, and did not like to see him with them.  There was nothing out of the way in Pyotr Dmitritch’s lazily raking together the hay in order to sit down on it with Lubotchka and chatter to her of trivialities; there was nothing out of the way, either, in pretty Lubotchka’s looking at him with her soft eyes; but yet Olga Mihalovna felt vexed with her husband and frightened and pleased that she could listen to them.

“Sit down, enchantress,” said Pyotr Dmitritch, sinking down on the hay and stretching.  “That’s right.  Come, tell me something.”

“What next!  If I begin telling you anything you will go to sleep.”

“Me go to sleep?  Allah forbid!  Can I go to sleep while eyes like yours are watching me?”

In her husband’s words, and in the fact that he was lolling with his hat on the back of his head in the presence of a lady, there was nothing out of the way either.  He was spoilt by women, knew that they found him attractive, and had adopted with them a special tone which every one said suited him.  With Lubotchka he behaved as with all women.  But, all the same, Olga Mihalovna was jealous.

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Project Gutenberg
The Party from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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