Pélléas and Mélisande eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 81 pages of information about Pllas and Mlisande.

MELISANDE.

I am beginning to be cold....

GOLAUD.

Will you come with me!

MELISANDE.

No, no; I will stay here....

GOLAUD.

You cannot stay here all alone.  You cannot stay here all night long....  What is your name?

MELISANDE.

Melisande.

GOLAUD.

You cannot stay here, Melisande.  Come with me....

MELISANDE.

I will stay here....

GOLAUD.

You will be afraid, all alone.  We do not know what there may be here ... all night long ... all alone ... it is impossible.  Melisande, come, give me your hand....

MELISANDE.

Oh, do not touch me!...

GOLAUD.

Do not scream....  I will not touch you again.  But come with me.  The night will be very dark and very cold.  Come with me....

MELISANDE.

Where are you going?...

GOLAUD.

I do not know....  I am lost too....
          
                                                     [Exeunt.

SCENE III.—­A hall in the castle.  ARKEL and GENEVIEVE
discovered.

GENEVIEVE.

Here is what he writes to his brother Pelleas:  “I found her all in tears one evening, beside a spring in the forest where I had lost myself.  I do not know her age, nor who she is, nor whence she comes, and I dare not question her, for she must have had a sore fright; and when you ask her what has happened to her, she falls at once a-weeping like a child, and sobs so heavily you are afraid.  Just as I found her by the springs, a crown of gold had slipped from her hair and fallen to the bottom of the water.  She was clad, besides, like a princess, though her garments had been torn by the briers.  It is now six months since I married her and I know no more about it than on the day of our meeting.  Meanwhile, dear Pelleas, thou whom I love more than a brother, although we were not born of the same father; meanwhile make ready for my return....  I know my mother will willingly forgive me.  But I am afraid of the King, our venerable grandsire, I am afraid of Arkel, in spite of all his kindness, for I have undone by this strange marriage all his plans of state, and I fear the beauty of Melisande will not excuse my folly to eyes so wise as his.  If he consents nevertheless to receive her as he would receive his own daughter, the third night following this letter, light a lamp at the top of the tower that overlooks the sea.  I shall perceive it from the bridge of our ship; otherwise I shall go far away again and come back no more....”  What say you of it?

ARKEL.

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Pélléas and Mélisande from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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