Pélléas and Mélisande eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 81 pages of information about Pllas and Mlisande.

ARKEL (turning).

What is the matter?

THE PHYSICIAN (approaching the bed and feeling the body).

They are right....
          
                                               [A long silence.

ARKEL.

I saw nothing.—­Are you sure?...

THE PHYSICIAN.

Yes, yes.

ARKEL.

I heard nothing....  So quick, so quick!...  All at once!...  She goes without a word....

GOLAUD (sobbing).

Oh! oh! oh!

ARKEL.

Do not stay here, Golaud....  She must have silence now....  Come, come....  It is terrible, but it is not your fault....  ’T was a little being, so quiet, so fearful, and so silent....  ’T was a poor little mysterious being, like everybody....  She lies there as if she were the big sister of her child....  Come, come....  My God!  My God!...  I shall never understand it at all....  Let us not stay here.—­Come; the child most not stay here in this room....  She must live now in her place....  It is the poor little one’s turn....
                                                 [They go out in silence.

[CURTAIN.]

Alladine and Palomides.

To Camille Mauclair.

Persons.

ABLAMORE.

ASTOLAINE, daughter of Ablamore.

ALLADINE.

PALOMIDES.

THE SISTERS OF PALOMIDES.

A PHYSICIAN.

[NOTE:  The translation of Ablamore’s song is taken from the version of this play made by the editors of “Poet-lore.”  R.H.]

Alladine and Palomides.

* * * * *

ACT FIRST.

A-wild part of the gardens.  ABLAMORE discovered leaning over ALLADINE, who is asleep.

ABLAMORE.

Methinks sleep reigns day and night beneath these trees.  Each time she comes here with me toward nightfall, she is hardly seated when she falls asleep.  Alas!  I must be glad even of that....  During the day, whene’er I speak to her and her look happens to encounter mine, it is hard as a slave’s to whom a thing impossible has just been bidden....  Yet that is not her customary look....  I have seen her many times resting her beautiful eyes on children, on the forest, the sea, or her surroundings.  She smiles at me as one smiles on a foe; and I dare not bend over her save at times when her eyes can no longer see me....  I have a few moments every evening; and all the rest of the day I live beside her with my eyes cast down....  It is sad to love too late....  Maids cannot understand that years do not separate hearts....  They have called me “The wise King."...  I was wise because till now nothing had happened to me....  There are men who seem to turn events aside.  It was enough

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Pélléas and Mélisande from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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