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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 142 pages of information about Barford Abbey.

Well, Molesworth,—­well—­I can go no farther;—­yet I must;—­John, poor faithful John, says I must;—­says he shall be sent back again.—­But I have lost the use of my fingers:—­my head bobs from side to side like a pendulum.  Don’t stamp, don’t swear:  they have a few drops of your cordial more than I intended.—­It operates well.—­I long to administer a larger potion.—­Could you see how I am shifted—­now here—­now there—­by the torrent of joy, that like a deluge almost drives reason before it;—­I say, could you see me, you would not wonder at the few unconnected lines of

Yours,

Risby.

LETTER XXXVI.

The Honourable GEORGE MOLESWORTH to RICHARD RISBY, Esq;

Dover.

Darcey bears the joyful surprise beyond imagination:—­it has brought him from death to life.—­

Hear in what manner I proceeded;—­You may suppose the hurry in which I left Dover:—­I took no leave of my friend;—­his humane apothecary promis’d not to quit him in my absence:—­I gave orders when his Lordship enquir’d for me, that he should be told particular business of my own had call’d me to town express.—­It happen’d very convenient that I left him in a profound sleep.

Away I flew,—­agitated betwixt hope and fear:—­harrass’d by fatigue;—­not in a bed for three nights before;—­nature was almost wore out, when I alighted at the banker’s.

I accosted one of the clerks, desiring to speak with Mr. or Mrs. Delves [Footnote:  The name of the banker.]:—­the former not at home, I was immediately conducted to the latter, a genteel woman, about forty.—­She receiv’d me politely; but before I could acquaint her with the occasion of my visit, the door open’d, and in stepp’d a pretty sprightly girl, who on seeing me was going to retire.—­Do you want any thing, my love? said Mrs. Delves.  Only, Madam, she replied, if you think it proper for Miss Warley to get up.

Miss Warley! exclaim’d I.—­Great God!  Miss Warley!—­Tell me, Ladies, is Miss Warley really under your roof?—­Both at once, for both seem’d equally dispos’d to diffuse happiness, answer’d to my wishes.

I threw myself back in my chair:—­the surprise was more than I could support.—­Shall I tell you all my weakness?—­I even shed tears;—­yes, Dick, I shed tears:—­but they were drops of heart-felt gladness.

The Ladies look’d on each other,—­Mrs. Delves said in a tone that shew’d she was not without the darling passion of her sex,

Pardon me, Sir; I think I have heard Miss Warley has no brother,—­or I should think your emotion I saw him before me.—­But whoever you are, this humanity is noble.—­Indeed, the poor young Lady has been extremely ill.

I am not her brother, Madam, return’d I.—­It is true, she has no brother;—­but she has parents, she has friends, who lament her dead:—­their sorrow has been mine.

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