The Story of Crisco eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 267 pages of information about The Story of Crisco.

[Illustration]

Crisco contains richer food elements than butter.  As Crisco is richer, containing no moisture, one-fifth or one-fourth less can be used in each recipe.

Crisco always is uniform because it is a manufactured fat where quality and purity can be controlled.  It works perfectly into any dough, making the crust or loaf even textured.  It keeps sweet and pure indefinitely in the ordinary room temperature.

Keep Your Parlor and Your Kitchen Strangers

Kitchen odors are out of place in the parlor.  When frying with Crisco, as before explained, it is not necessary to heat the fat to smoking temperature, ideal frying is accomplished without bringing Crisco to its smoking point.  On the other hand, it is necessary to heat lard “smoking hot” before it is of the proper frying temperature.  Remember also that, when lard smokes and fills the house with its strong odor, certain constituents have been changed chemically to those which irritate the sensitive membranes of the alimentary canal.

[Illustration:  The Lard Kitchen.]

[Illustration:  The Crisco Kitchen—­No Smoke.]

Crisco does not smoke until it reaches 455 degrees, a heat higher than is necessary for frying.  You need not wait for Crisco to smoke.  Consequently the house will not fill with smoke, nor will there be black, burnt specks in fried foods, as often there are when you use lard for frying.

Crisco gives up its heat very quickly to the food submerged in it and a tender, brown crust almost instantly forms, allowing the inside of the potatoes, croquettes, doughnuts, etc., to become baked, rather than soaked.

[Illustration:  Fry this, Then this, Then this—­in the same Crisco.]

The same Crisco can be used for frying fish, onions, potatoes, or any other food.  Crisco does not take up food flavors or odors.  After frying each food, merely strain out the food particles.

We All Eat Raw Fats

The shortening fat in pastry or baked foods, is merely distributed throughout the dough.  No chemical change occurs during the baking process.  So when you eat pie or hot biscuit, in which animal lard is used, you eat raw animal lard.  The shortening used in all baked foods therefore, should be just as pure and wholesome as if you were eating it like butter upon bread.  Because Crisco digests with such ease, and because it is a pure vegetable fat, all those who realize the above fact regarding pastry making are now won over to Crisco.

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A hint as to Crisco’s purity is shown by this simple test:  Break open a hot biscuit in which Crisco has been used.  You will note a sweet fragrance, which is most inviting.

[Illustration]

A few months ago if you had told dyspeptic men and women that they could eat pie at the evening meal and that distress would not follow, probably they would have doubted you.  Hundreds of instances of Crisco’s healthfulness have been given by people, who, at one time have been denied such foods as pastry, cake and fried foods, but who now eat these rich, yet digestible Crisco dishes.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Story of Crisco from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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