Beethoven's Letters 1790-1826, Volume 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 179 pages of information about Beethoven's Letters 1790-1826, Volume 2.

[Footnote 1:  Carl Czerny relates in the Vienna A.M.  Zeitung of 1845, No. 113, as follows:—­“Beethoven came to me usually every day himself with the boy, and used to say to me, ’You must not think that you please me by making Carl play my works; I am not so childish as to wish anything of the kind.  Give him whatever you think best.’  I named Clementi.  ‘Yes, yes,’ said he, ‘Clementi is very good indeed;’ and, added he, laughing, ’Give Carl occasionally what is according to rule, that he may hereafter come to what is contrary to rule.’  After a hit of this sort, which he introduced into almost every speech, he used to burst into a loud peal of laughter.  Having in the earlier part of his career been often reproached by the critics with his irregularities, he was in the habit of alluding to this with gay humor.”]

229.

TO CZERNY.

DEAR CZERNY,—­

I beg you will say nothing on that particular subject at Giannatasio’s, who dined with us on the day you were so good as to call on me; he requested this himself.  I will tell you the reason when we meet.  I hope to be able to prove my gratitude for your patience with my nephew, that I may not always remain your debtor.  In haste,

Your friend,

BEETHOVEN.

230.

TO CZERNY.

DEAR CZERNY,—­

Can you in any way assist the man I now send to you (a pianoforte maker and tuner from Baden) in selling his instruments?  Though small in size, their manufacture is solid.  In haste,

Your friend,

BEETHOVEN.

231.

TO ZMESKALL.

Wednesday, July 3, 1817.

DEAR ZMESKALL,—­

I have changed my mind.  It might hurt the feelings of Carl’s mother to see her child in the house of a stranger, which would be more harsh than I like; so I shall allow her to come to my house to-morrow; a certain tutor at Puthon, of the name of Bihler, will also be present.  I should be extremely glad if you could be with me about six o’clock, but not later.  Indeed, I earnestly beg you to come, as I am desirous to show the Court that you are present, for there is no doubt that a Court Secretary will be held in higher estimation by them than a man without an official character, whatever his moral character may be!

Now, jesting apart, independent of my real affection for you, your coming will be of great service to me.  I shall therefore expect you without fail.  I beg you will not take my badinage amiss.  I am, with sincere esteem,

Your friend,

BEETHOVEN

232.

TO G. DEL RIO.

Your friend has no doubt told you of my intention to send for Carl early to-morrow.  I wish to place his mother in a more creditable position with the neighborhood; so I have agreed to pay her the compliment of taking her son to see her in the company of a third person.  This is to be done once a month.

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Beethoven's Letters 1790-1826, Volume 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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