The Personal Life of David Livingstone eBook

William Garden Blaikie
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 546 pages of information about The Personal Life of David Livingstone.
of 1867—­Great privations and difficulties—­Illness—­Rebellion among his men—­Discovery of Lake Bangweolo—­Its oozy banks—­Detention—­Sufferings—­He makes for Ujiji—­Very severe illness in beginning of 1869—­Reaches Ujiji—­Finds his goods have been wasted and stolen—­Most bitter disappointment—­His medicines, etc., at Unyanyembe—­Letter to Sultan of Zanzibar—­Letters to Dr. Moffat and his daughter.

CHAPTER XX.

MANYUEMA.

A.D. 1869-1871.

He sets out to explore Manyuema and the river Lualaba—­Loss of forty-two letters—­His feebleness through illness—­He arrives at Bambarre—­Becomes acquainted with the soko or gorilla—­Reaches the Luama River—­Magnificence of the country—­Repulsiveness of the people—­Cannot get a canoe to explore the Lualaba—­Has to return to Bambarre—­Letter to Thomas, and retrospect of his life—­Letter to Sir Thomas Maclear and Mr. Mann—­Miss Tinne—­He is worse in health than ever, yet resolves to add to his programme and go round Lake Bangweolo—­Letter to Agnes—­Review of the past—­He sets out anew in a more northerly direction—­Overpowered by constant wet—­Reaches Nyangwe, the farthest point northward in his last Expedition—­Long detention—­Letter to his brother John—­Sense of difficulties and troubles—­Nobility of his spirit—­He sets off with only three attendants for the Lualaba—­Suspicions of the natives—­Influence of Arab traders—­Frightful difficulties of the way—­Lamed by footsores—­Has to return to Bambarre—­Long and wearisome detention—­Occupations—­Meditations and reveries—­Death no terror—­Unparalleled position and trials—­He reads his Bible from beginning to end four times—­Letter to Sir Thomas Maclear—­To Agnes—­His delight at her sentiments about his coming home—­Account of the soko—­Grief to heat of death of Lady Murchison—­Wretched character of men sent from Zanzibar—­At last sets out with Mohamad—­Difficulties—­Slave-trade most horrible—­Cannot get canoes for Lualaba—­Long waiting—­New plan—­Frustrated by horrible massacre on banks of Lualaba—­Frightful scene—­He must return to Ujiji—­New illness—­Perils of journey to Ujiji—­Life three times endangered in one day—­Reaches Ujiji—­Shereef has sold off his goods—­He is almost in despair—­Meets Henry M. Stanley and is relieved—­His contributions to Natural Science during last journeys—­Professor Owen in the Quarterly Review.

CHAPTER XXI.

LIVINGSTONE AND STANLEY.

A.D. 1871-1872.

Mr. Gordon Bennett sends Stanley in search of Livingstone—­Stanley at Zanzibar—­Starts for Ujiji—­Reaches Unyanyembe—­Dangerous illness—­War between Arabs and natives—­Narrow escape of Stanley—­Approach to Ujiji—­Meeting with Livingstone—­Livingstone’s story—­Stanley’s news—­Livingstone’s goods and men at Bagamoio—­Stanley’s account of Livingstone—­Refutation of foolish and calumnious charges—­They go

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The Personal Life of David Livingstone from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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