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William Garden Blaikie
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 546 pages of information about The Personal Life of David Livingstone.
of 1867—­Great privations and difficulties—­Illness—­Rebellion among his men—­Discovery of Lake Bangweolo—­Its oozy banks—­Detention—­Sufferings—­He makes for Ujiji—­Very severe illness in beginning of 1869—­Reaches Ujiji—­Finds his goods have been wasted and stolen—­Most bitter disappointment—­His medicines, etc., at Unyanyembe—­Letter to Sultan of Zanzibar—­Letters to Dr. Moffat and his daughter.

CHAPTER XX.

MANYUEMA.

A.D. 1869-1871.

He sets out to explore Manyuema and the river Lualaba—­Loss of forty-two letters—­His feebleness through illness—­He arrives at Bambarre—­Becomes acquainted with the soko or gorilla—­Reaches the Luama River—­Magnificence of the country—­Repulsiveness of the people—­Cannot get a canoe to explore the Lualaba—­Has to return to Bambarre—­Letter to Thomas, and retrospect of his life—­Letter to Sir Thomas Maclear and Mr. Mann—­Miss Tinne—­He is worse in health than ever, yet resolves to add to his programme and go round Lake Bangweolo—­Letter to Agnes—­Review of the past—­He sets out anew in a more northerly direction—­Overpowered by constant wet—­Reaches Nyangwe, the farthest point northward in his last Expedition—­Long detention—­Letter to his brother John—­Sense of difficulties and troubles—­Nobility of his spirit—­He sets off with only three attendants for the Lualaba—­Suspicions of the natives—­Influence of Arab traders—­Frightful difficulties of the way—­Lamed by footsores—­Has to return to Bambarre—­Long and wearisome detention—­Occupations—­Meditations and reveries—­Death no terror—­Unparalleled position and trials—­He reads his Bible from beginning to end four times—­Letter to Sir Thomas Maclear—­To Agnes—­His delight at her sentiments about his coming home—­Account of the soko—­Grief to heat of death of Lady Murchison—­Wretched character of men sent from Zanzibar—­At last sets out with Mohamad—­Difficulties—­Slave-trade most horrible—­Cannot get canoes for Lualaba—­Long waiting—­New plan—­Frustrated by horrible massacre on banks of Lualaba—­Frightful scene—­He must return to Ujiji—­New illness—­Perils of journey to Ujiji—­Life three times endangered in one day—­Reaches Ujiji—­Shereef has sold off his goods—­He is almost in despair—­Meets Henry M. Stanley and is relieved—­His contributions to Natural Science during last journeys—­Professor Owen in the Quarterly Review.

CHAPTER XXI.

LIVINGSTONE AND STANLEY.

A.D. 1871-1872.

Mr. Gordon Bennett sends Stanley in search of Livingstone—­Stanley at Zanzibar—­Starts for Ujiji—­Reaches Unyanyembe—­Dangerous illness—­War between Arabs and natives—­Narrow escape of Stanley—­Approach to Ujiji—­Meeting with Livingstone—­Livingstone’s story—­Stanley’s news—­Livingstone’s goods and men at Bagamoio—­Stanley’s account of Livingstone—­Refutation of foolish and calumnious charges—­They go

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