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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 146 pages of information about Savva and the Life of Man.

LIPA (frightened)

No, stay, Mr. Speransky.  Please stay, I beg you.

SAVVA

If you don’t go at once, I’ll throw you out of the window.  Well?

SPERANSKY

Excuse me, I never had the faintest idea—­I was here with Mr. Anthony Tropinin.  I am going instantly.  Where is my hat?  I put it here somewhere—­

SAVVA

There’s your hat. (Throws it to him)

LIPA (feebly)

Stay here awhile longer, Mr. Speransky.  Sit down.

SPERANSKY

No, it’s late.  I must go to bed.  Good night, Miss Olympiada.  Good night, Mr. Tropinin.  Your brother is asleep already, I believe.  You ought to take him to bed.  I’m going, I’m going. (Exit)

SAVVA (speaking in a quiet, calm tone; his movements are heavy and slow, as if his body had suddenly stiffened) You know it?

LIPA

I do.

SAVVA

You know all?

LIPA

All.

SAVVA

Did the monk tell you?

LIPA

He did.

SAVVA

Well?

LIPA (drawing back a little, and raising her hand for protection)-Well, nothing will happen.  There’ll be no blowing up.  You understand, Savva, there’ll be no explosion.

[Pause.  Footsteps are heard in the street, and indistinct talking.  Savva turns around.  Stooping more than usually, he takes a turn around the room with peculiar slowness.

SAVVA

Well?

LIPA

Then you had better believe me, brother.  Believe me.

SAVVA

Yes?

LIPA

Why that was—­I don’t know what it was—­it was a piece of madness.  Think it over.

SAVVA

Is it really true?

LIPA

Yes, it’s true.  It’s all over.  You can’t help it any more.  There is nothing for you to do.

SAVVA

Tell me how it happened. (Sits down deliberately, his eyes fixed on Lipa)

LIPA

I guessed a little something long ago—­that day when you spoke to me—­only I didn’t know exactly what it was.  And I saw the little machine too.  I have another key to the trunk.

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