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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 146 pages of information about Savva and the Life of Man.

LIPA

Have you seen Savva?

SPERANSKY

No, I am sorry to say I haven’t.  I say, they buried three people to-day.  One old man—­perhaps you knew him—­Peter Khvorostov?

LIPA

Yes, I knew him.  So he’s dead?

SPERANSKY

Yes, and two children.  The women wept a great deal.

LIPA

What did they die of?

SPERANSKY

I am sorry, but I don’t know.  It didn’t interest me.  Some children’s disease, I suppose.  When children die, Miss Olympiada, they turn all blue and look as if they wanted to cry.  The faces of grown people are tranquil, but children’s faces are not.  Why is that so?

LIPA

I don’t know—­I’ve never noticed it.

SPERANSKY

It’s a very interesting phenomenon.

LIPA

There’s father now.  I told you to go to bed.  Now I’ve got to listen to your brawling.  I’ll get out.

(Exit.  Enter Yegor Tropinin)

YEGOR

Who lighted the lamp?

SPERANSKY

Good evening, Mr. Tropinin.

YEGOR

Good evening.  Who lighted the lamp?

SPERANSKY

Miss Olympiada.

YEGOR (blowing it out)

Learned it from Savva. (To Tony) And you, what’s the matter with you?  How long, how long, for Christ’s sake?  How long am I to stand all this from you, you good-for-nothing loafers?  Eh?  Where did you get the whiskey, eh?

TONY

At the bar.

YEGOR

It wasn’t put there for you, was it?

TONY

You have a very funny face, father.

YEGOR

Give me the whiskey.

TONY

I won’t.

YEGOR

Give here!

TONY

I won’t.

YEGOR (slaps his face)

Give it to me, I say.

TONY (falls on the sofa, still holding on to the bottle)

I won’t.

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