Ten Reasons Proposed to His Adversaries for Disputation in the Name eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 103 pages of information about Ten Reasons Proposed to His Adversaries for Disputation in the Name.
our Society and their calumnies and the part that we are taking.  The only course left open to me (since as I see, it is tortures, not academic disputations, that the high-priests are making ready) was to make good to you the account of my conduct; to show you the chief heads and point my finger to the sources from whence I derive this confidence; to exhort you also, as it is your concern above others, to give to this business that attention which Christ, the Church, the Common Weal, and your own salvation demand of you.  If it were confidence in my own talents, erudition, art, reading, memory, that led me to challenge all the skill that could be brought against me, then were I the vainest and proudest of mortals, not having considered either myself or my opponents.  But if, with my cause before my eyes, I thought myself competent to show that the sun here shines at noon-day, you ought to allow in me that heat which the honour of Jesus Christ, my King, and the unconquered force of truth have put upon me.  You know how in Marcus Tullius’s speech for Publius Quintius, when Roscius promised that he should win the case if he could make out by arguments that a journey of 700 miles had not been accomplished in two days, Cicero not only had no fear of all the force of the pleading of the opposing counsel, Hortensius, but could not have been afraid even of greater orators than Hortensius, men of the stamp of Cotta and Antonius and Crassus, whose reputation for speaking he set higher than that of all other men:  for truth does sometimes stand out in so clear a light that no artifice of word or deed can hide it.  Now the case on our side is clearer even than that position of Roscius.  I have only to evince this, that there is a Heaven, that there is a God, that there is a Faith, that there is a Christ, and I have gained my cause.  Standing on such ground should I not pluck up heart?  I may be killed, beaten I cannot be.  I take my stand on those Doctors, whom that Spirit has instructed who is neither deceived nor overcome.  I beg of you, consent to be saved.  Of those from whom I obtain this consent I expect without the least doubt that all the rest will follow.  Only give yourselves up to take interest in this inquiry, entreat Christ, add efforts of your own, and certainly you will perceive how the case lies, how our adversaries are in despair, and ourselves so solidly founded that we cannot but desire this conflict with serene and high courage.  I am brief here, because I address you in the rest of my discourse.  Farewell.

FIRST REASON

HOLY WRIT

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Ten Reasons Proposed to His Adversaries for Disputation in the Name from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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