Lives of the Most Remarkable Criminals Who have been Condemned and Executed for Murder, the Highway, Housebreaking, Street Robberies, Coining or other offences eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,040 pages of information about Lives of the Most Remarkable Criminals Who have been Condemned and Executed for Murder, the Highway, Housebreaking, Street Robberies, Coining or other offences.
Perry enraged, swore he would see me out, and struck me with his sword in his scabbard over the head.  He drew his sword and made several passes at me, I still retreated till provoked to draw my sword to preserve myself.  This affair was in the night.  I received a wound in my right hand thumb, and a thrust through my coat.  This I declare to be the whole truth, as I shall answer before my great God; though my persecutors, Toms and the deceased man’s wife, swore quite the reverse, which took place to my ruin.  I pray God forgive them their trespasses, as I hope forgiveness for my own.  I pray God bless my good colonel for his care and endeavours for my safety; I pray God bless him with length of days and prosperity in all his undertakings.  I thank God, I never wronged man, woman, or child, to my knowledge, nor was I ever inclined to quarrel.  I heartily beg of God pardon and forgiveness for my sins, and I confide in the merits of my dear Saviour, who died for the World.  I was baptized and bred a member of the Church of England (though an unworthy and unfortunate one) in which Communion I hope for salvation through my blessed Redeemer.

    Sunday, February the 12th, 1726.

    Robert Haynes

The Lives of THOMAS TIMMS, THOMAS PERRY, and EDWARD BROWN, Footpads

This poor unhappy man, Thomas Timms, was the son of mean parents in the country and as indifferently educated as he was born, so that his future ill-deeds were capable of some little extenuation.  With much to-do his friends and parents raised money enough to put him out apprentice to a chair-carver, with whom he lived easily and honestly during the space of his apprenticeship, coming out of it with the character of an honest religious young lad, which he maintained after he was set up and married.  He had probably continued to maintain it to the end of his life if he had not fallen into unhappy circumstances, by being out of work.  This obliged him to come up to Town, where for a while he lived pretty well upon his business; but at last it so far fell off that he was obliged to list himself a soldier in the first regiment of Guards.  Notwithstanding this he worked still at his trade, as much as it was possible for him to do, and to perform his duty; but misfortunes still crowding upon him, he grew at first melancholy, and at last took to drinking in the company of bad women, who soon drew him into thinking of taking dishonest methods to obtain money for the support of their debaucheries.

Amongst other of his acquaintance there was a woman who had formerly lived with a very eminent lawyer in the City.  It was said she had a greater familiarity with her master than she ought to have had, from whence she took the liberty to cheat him most egregiously, especially by counterfeiting receipts from most of the tradesmen with whom her master had any dealing, by which means she retained in her own hands the money which she should have paid him.  Some months after, however, the roguery was discovered, and her master being newly married, he took this opportunity to discharge her suddenly.  However, he promised her, if she went into any lodgings, and gave him notice, he would take care she should not want, until she could get herself into some way of business or other.

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Lives of the Most Remarkable Criminals Who have been Condemned and Executed for Murder, the Highway, Housebreaking, Street Robberies, Coining or other offences from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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