The Making of Arguments eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 344 pages of information about The Making of Arguments.

[Footnote 10:  From Huxley’s first Lecture on Evolution (see p. 233).]

[Footnote 11:  C.R.  Woodruff, City Government by Commission, New York, 1911, p. 6]

[Footnote 12:  See Lincoln’s speech at Ottawa.]

[Footnote 13:  The Outlook, November 20, 1909.  See also the example quoted on page 180, from William James’s Will to Believe.]

[Footnote 14:  A full and very readable account of the growth of the law of evidence and the changes in the system of trial by jury will be found in J. B. Thayer’s Preliminary Treatise on the Law of Evidence, Boston, 1896.]

[Footnote 15:  George Bemis, Report of the Case of John W. Webster, Boston, 1850, p. 462.  Quoted in part by A.S.  Hill, Principles of Rhetoric, p. 340.]

[Footnote 16:  H. Muensterberg.  On the Witness Stand, New York, 1908, p. 51.]

[Footnote 17:  The Nation, New York, Vol.  XCI, p. 603, In a review of J. Bigelow, Jr.’s Campaign of Chancellorsville.]

[Footnote 18:  Mr. Gardiner was answering Father Gerard’s book on the Gunpowder Plot.]

[Footnote 19:  S. R. Gardiner, What Gunpowder Plot Was, London, 1897, pp. 4-11.]

[Footnote 20:  Wines and Koren, The Liquor Problem.  Published by the Committee of Fifty, Boston, 1897.]

[Footnote 21:  Reprinted in Educational Reform, New York, 1898.  See p. 381.]

[Footnote 22:  A committee appointed by the National Educational Association to recommend a course of study for secondary schools.]

[Footnote 23:  H. Muensterberg, On the Witness Stand, New York, 1908, p. 39.]

[Footnote 24:  W. James, Psychology, New York, 1890, Vol.  II, p. 330; B.H.  Bode, An Outline of Logic, New York. 1910, p. 216.]

[Footnote 25:  B. H. Bode, An Outline of Logic, New York, 1910, p. 170.]

[Footnote 26:  C. R. Woodruff, City Government by Commission, p. 184.]

[Footnote 27:  Professor John Trowbridge, in the Harvard Graduates Magazine, for March, 1911.]

[Footnote 28:  W. James, Human Immortality, Boston, 1898, p. 11.]

[Footnote 29:  B. H. Bode, An Outline of Logic, New York, 1910, p. 162.]

[Footnote 30:  The Origin of Species, London, 1875, p. 63.]

[Footnote 31:  “There is only one aim in all generalization—­the finding of signs that are fit to be trusted, so that, given one fact, another may be inferred.”—­A.  Sidgwick, The Process of Argument, London, 1893, p. 108.

“The whole object of any class name is to group together (for the purpose of making general assertions) individual members which are not only alike but different; and so to give unity in spite of difference.”—­A.  Sidgwick, The Use of Words in Reasoning, London, 1901, p. 165.]

[Footnote 32:  W. James, Psychology, New York, 1890, Vol.  II, p. 342.]

[Footnote 33:  See B. Bosanquet, The Essentials of Logic, London, 1895, p. 162; A. Sidgwick, The Process of Argument, London, 1893, chap. vi; B.H.  Bode, An Outline of Logic, New York, 1910, p. 234.]

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