International Weekly Miscellany of Literature, Art, and Science — Volume 1, No. 4, July 22, 1850 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 95 pages of information about International Weekly Miscellany of Literature, Art, and Science Volume 1, No. 4, July 22, 1850.
highest credit to the Parisians, and especially to their municipal authorities.  The names are arranged in chronological order, but without date, and without regard to the nationality of, or to the peculiar distinction achieved by the individual; thus the two last names are those of Berzelius, the Swedish savant, and Chateaubriand; and a little above them figures Walter Scott, Byron, and other English immortals.  Living celebrities are of course excluded.

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MR. HARTLEY, a benevolent English gentleman, directed in his will that L200 should be set apart as a prize for the best essay on Emigration, and appointed the American Minister trustee of the fund.  The Vice Chancellor has decided that the bequest is void, for the reason that such an essay would encourage people to emigrate to the United States, and so to throw off their allegiance to the Queen!  Another decision equally wise was made at the same time in regard to a prize for a treatise on Natural Theology.  The learned Vice Chancellor regarded it as calculated to “subvert the Church.”

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RECENT DEATHS.

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ROBERT EGLESFELD GRIFFITH, M.D., died in Philadelphia, on the 27th ult., in the fifty-third year of his age.  Dr. Griffith possessed fine talents; in addition to a thorough knowledge of his profession, he was familiar with most of the branches of natural science, while in botany and conchology he stood second to few in this country; and his social and moral qualities were of the highest order.  He filled in succession the chairs of Materia Medica and Pharmacy in the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy; of Materia Medica, Therapeutics, Hygiene, and Medical Jurisprudence in the University of Virginia.  Whilst laboring in the latter station his health failed him, and he was induced to seek a winters residence in the West Indies in hopes of its restoration.  It became evident, however, that his health was permanently broken, and for the last four years he has resided in his native city, Though suffering much, his energy and industry never flagged:  and he has given the results of his labors in his Medical Botany and his Universal Formulary, two works which will secure him a permanent reputation.  He also enriched by his annotations a number of works republished in this country, among which we may mention Christison’s Dispensatory, Taylor’s Medical Jurisprudence, Ryan’s Medical Jurisprudence, Ballard and Garrod’s Materia Medica.

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F. MANSELL REYNOLDS, the eldest son of the late F. Reynolds, the dramatic author, died recently at Fontainebleau.  He was long intimate with and favorably known to literary circles in England, counting such men as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Bernal, Lockhart, Hook, and many others, among his personal friends.  As the editor of “Heath’s Keepsake,” when it started, he proved himself a person of taste and ability.  He was also the author of “Miserrimus,” which excited a considerable sensation when published, and of one or two other works of fiction, which, together with his contributions to several serials, displayed much variety of talent.

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International Weekly Miscellany of Literature, Art, and Science — Volume 1, No. 4, July 22, 1850 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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