The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 09 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 505 pages of information about The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 09.

WILKENS.

I really was going in another direction, but I thought I’d better see.  And immediately I see some one standing absorbed in thought, not far from the house.  It’s Andrew.  You ask him, I say to myself.  Well!  As he hears me coming he starts up, gives me a wild look, and—­is gone.  I call after him.  Well!  It seems he has forgotten his name.  I run after him, but he—­disappears, as if he had an evil conscience.

SOPHY.

I wonder what that can mean.

FORESTER (calls out of the window, with authority).

Andrew!

WILKENS.

There he comes.

SCENE VIII

The same.  The PASTOR; WEILER seated.  WEILER.

It’s the pastor! [All exchange greetings.]

SOPHY.

God be praised!  Our good pastor!

FORESTER.

You are under the impression that you are coming to the betrothal, pastor, but—­

PASTOR.

I know all that has been going on here.

FORESTER.

Mr. Stein—­

PASTOR.

I have just come from him.  And the message I have to give you—­I know, you will not receive it less kindly because I am the messenger.

SOPHY.

If you come from Mr. Stein, then everything may still end well.  But, pastor, you do not know how obstinate that man is.

PASTOR.

How so?  I know everything.  But yet he is not the chief culprit; otherwise I should not be here as Stein’s ambassador.  He is willing to take the first step.

WILKENS.

I should not take it, if I were the master.

PASTOR.

Yes, old friend Ulrich, Stein is sorry that his impetuosity was the cause of spoiling this beautiful day.

FORESTER.

Do you hear that, cousin Wilkens?

PASTOR.

The threat about dismissal was not meant as seriously as it sounded.

FORESTER.

Do you hear, Weiler?

PASTOR.

That the matter should rest there—­

FORESTER.

Should rest there?  Pray, what does he mean by that?

PASTOR.

He means that he could not retract his word immediately without making himself ridiculous.  He thinks you would see this yourself.

FORESTER (drawling).

Indeed?  And Godfrey?

PASTOR (shrugs his shoulders).

Is forester of Duesterwalde for the
time being.  That cannot be helped—­

FORESTER.

That is what you say.  But I tell you Godfrey is not.  I am the forester of Duesterwalde.  That I am, and that I remain, until Mr. Stein proves that I have not acted in accordance with my duty.

PASTOR.

But, in order that you might see how ready he is, for his part, to redress his share of the wrong and to reestablish the old comfortable relation, you are to draw the double amount of your present salary as a pension.

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The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 09 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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