The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 09 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 505 pages of information about The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 09.

[Short pause.  Then he rises again, takes his cane and hat and throws both down again.]

No, it won’t do—­It simply will not do.  Well!  I should make myself ridiculous forever!  This time he must come to me; I can’t help him.  But perhaps he has already—­isn’t that Moeller?

[Hastens toward the person coming in.]

SCENE II

ROBERT; STEIN.

ROBERT (entering, in a passion).

You will ruin my happiness, father?

STEIN (surprised, indignant).

Robert!

ROBERT.

You have no right to do that.

STEIN.

That’s the last straw!  Now you too must come along and set me fuming.

ROBERT.

Father, you have me fetched away from the betrothal festivities like a child from his playthings.  But I am no child to whom one gives and takes away as one likes.  I have your word, and you must keep it.  Do you intend to sacrifice my happiness to a whim?  Paternal authority cannot go so far.

STEIN.

But tell me, what is your object in saying this?

ROBERT.

I wish to ask you whether you intend to bring about a reconciliation between the forester and yourself.

STEIN.

Boy, how can you dare to ask?  Do you mean to call me to account?  Go to that obstinate fellow.  It is he that is in the wrong; it is he that must yield!

ROBERT.

I just came from the forester; he referred me to you.

STEIN.

I can do nothing.  And now leave me in peace.

ROBERT.

You will do nothing toward a reconciliation?

STEIN.

Nothing, unless he yields.  And now go your ways.

ROBERT.

If you will do nothing toward a reconciliation I shall never again cross his threshold.  Andrew and I have become mortal enemies.  Perhaps this very day I shall face him in an encounter for life and death.  Come what may, I have done everything I was able to do.  Father, no blame can attach to me.  If a catastrophe takes place—­you could have prevented it, the forester could have prevented it.  Mary is mine, and neither you nor the forester shall take her from me.

STEIN.

Are you mad, boy?  To your room this moment!  Do you hear?

ROBERT.

Father, I ask you—­

STEIN.

You shall obey, not ask!

ROBERT.

Your anger carries you away.  Father, I implore you, do not tear open the wound which healed only because I made allowance for your excited state.  I shall wait till you have become calm; till you are again master of yourself.

STEIN.

You see that I am master of myself.  You try to provoke me by all means, and you do not succeed.  But now not another word!  Not a sound!

ROBERT (beside himself).

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The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 09 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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