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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 97 pages of information about International Weekly Miscellany Volume 1, No. 3, July 15, 1850.

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A PORTRAIT OF CAPTAIN SUTTER, of California, has just been engraved in the finest style of Sartain, from a painting by S.S.  Osgood, made while that excellent artist was in the Gold Region.  It is a remarkably strong and pleasing head, and it will rank among Mr. Osgood’s best productions.

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BALL HUGHES, the sculptor, is preparing a monument to be placed over the remains of Josiah Sturgis, at Mount Auburn.

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ORIGINAL POETRY.

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THE CHILD OF FAME.

BY MRS. M.E.  HEWITT.

    “Je vivrai eternellement.”—­La vie de Sappho.  Traduction de
    Madame Dacier.

  Nay—­call me not thy rose—­thine own sweet flower,
    For oh, my soul to thy wild words is mute! 
  Leave me my gift of song—­my glorious dower—­
    My hand unchanged, and free to sweep the lute.

  Thus, when within the tomb thy memory slumbers,
    Mine, mine will tie of those immortal names
  Sung by the poet in undying numbers: 
    Call me not thine—­I am the world’s and fame’s!

  Were it not blissful, when from earth we sever,
    To know that we shall leave, with bard and sage,
  A name enrolled on fame’s bright page forever—­
    A wonder, and a theme to after age!

  Talk not of love!  I know how, wasted, broken,
    The trusting heart learns its sad lesson o’er—­
  Counting the roses Passion’s lips have spoken,
    Amid the thorns that pierce it to the core.

  Oh, heart of mine! that when life’s summer hour
    For thee with love’s bright blossoms hung the bough,
  Too quickly found an asp beneath the flower—­
    And is naught left thee but ambition now?

  Alas! alas! this brow its pride forsaking,
    Would give the glory of its laurel crown
  For one fond breast whereas to still its aching—­
    For one true heart that I might call mine own!

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[FROM THE NATIONAL ERA.]

ELDORADO:  ADVENTURES IN THE PATH OF EMPIRE.[2]

BY J.G.  WHITTIER.

With something of the grateful feeling which prompted the memorable exclamation of Sancho Panza, “Blessings on the man who first invented sleep!” we have laid down these pleasant volumes.  Blessings on the man who invented books of travel for the benefit of home idlers! the Marco Polos, the Sir John Mandevilles, and the Ibn Batutas of old time, and their modern disciples and imitators!  Nothing in the shape of travel and gossip, by the way, comes amiss to us, from Cook’s voyages round the earth to Count De Maistre’s journey round his chamber.  When the cark and care of daily life and homely duties, and the weary routine of sight and sound, oppress

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