International Weekly Miscellany — Volume 1, No. 3, July 15, 1850 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 97 pages of information about International Weekly Miscellany Volume 1, No. 3, July 15, 1850.

DR. GUTZLAFF, the famous missionary, is now in Germany, and he had recently an interview with the Presidents of the Corporation of Merchants of Stettin, to give them some information as to the sort of goods best adapted for exportation to China.  He held out very little encouragement of a profitable trade with that country at present, as he said he could not name a single article of German manufacture he thought likely to secure any great demand.  He commended the English government for establishing a “Chinese Exhibition,” in order to instruct the merchants of the real nature and quality of Chinese productions. (He must have meant the exhibition of the late Mr. Dunn, of Philadelphia, so long open in London, and erroneously supposed that it was a government institution.) He also described the Chinese language itself, on account of its extreme difficulty, as the chief obstacle in the way of the civilization of the people.  He did not believe the most learned Chinese perfectly knew his alphabet, as after twenty years’ study he could not say he was master of it, a fact highly discouraging to the German savans.

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A new Historical Society was formed at Hartford, Conn., a few weeks ago, under the title of the Historical Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States.  A constitution was formed, and Bishop Brownwell elected President.  The objects are to collect and preserve such materials, as may serve to illustrate the history of the Episcopal church, and the collection and preservation of all memorials, printed, manuscript, or traditional, which throw light on the progress of the American branch of that church, in any period, and of all materials relating to the social and religious history of the times during which that church has existed.

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THE FINE ARTS.

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ELLIOTT is the subject of an editorial chapter in the Knickerbocker, in which justice and no more than justice, is done to him.  In the regular succession he follows Copley, Stuart, Jarvis, Newton, and Inman, as the first portrait-painter of his time in the United States.  Elliott has recently finished a very effective head of Dr. John W. Francis, to be placed in the permanent gallery of the Art Union, of which Dr. Francis was the first President.  He is now engaged upon a portrait of Washington Irving, which will be engraved in the most elaborate style by Cheney.

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MINOR K. KELLOGG has nearly completed, for Mr. Higgs, the banker, of Washington, an exquisite picture which he calls The Greek Girl,—­similar, but we think in all respects superior, to his beautiful Circassian Girl, engravings of which by a Parisian artist have some time formed one of the attractions of the print shops.  Mr. Kellogg is also painting a full-length of General Scott, for the city.

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International Weekly Miscellany — Volume 1, No. 3, July 15, 1850 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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