Three Expeditions into the Interior of Eastern Australia, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 445 pages of information about Three Expeditions into the Interior of Eastern Australia, Volume 1.

ARRIVE AT BUREE.

On reaching Captain Raine’s station at Buree, a native named Sandy informed me of the melancholy end of poor Cunningham; the particulars he described having been gathered by him from other natives who were eye-witnesses of the appalling circumstances.  A report from the officer of mounted police, whom these natives afterwards guided to the remains of my unfortunate fellow-traveller will be found in the Appendix 1.2.

I hastened to Bathurst and made arrangements for sending back a cart and fresh horses to bring on the sick men of the party, as quickly as possible to the hospital.  Whiting, contrary to my expectation, lived to reach it; and he and the other invalids having received every attention from Mr. Busby, the Government surgeon, were restored to health in about three weeks after their arrival.

...

(BAROMETRICAL JOURNAL KEPT DURING THE JOURNEY INTO THE INTERIOR OF NEW SOUTH WALES IN WINTER 1835.

RANGE OF THE THERMOMETER AND JOURNAL OF THE WEATHER.)

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APPENDIX 1.1.

LETTER FROM CAPTAIN FORBES, 39TH FOOT, COMMANDANT OF THE MOUNTED POLICE.

Sydney, Sunday Night, 10 o’clock, 27th November, 1831.

My Dear Major,

Colonel Lindesay desires me to say that although there is no relief on the road he thinks it of sufficient importance to despatch a man all the way through to Pewen Bewen, to acquaint you with what we have just heard by express, that The Barber HAS ESCAPED.

I need not say how exceedingly I regret this on all accounts, but particularly as I think it is likely to add to your difficulties; and certainly does increase the necessity for very great vigilance and caution on your part and that of your men, but PARTICULARLY OF YOUR OWN.  The Barber succeeded in filing his irons through and again digging through the wall, there was no military guard over the gaol, and the constable in charge appears to have deserted his post.

The Barber is supposed with what reason I know not to have made for Liverpool Plains, and old Sergeant Wilcox is again despatched after him.  It is probable that he would rather avoid than approach so strong a party as yours, but nevertheless it will be well to be very shy in letting any of the blacks come within your camp.  They are decidedly a treacherous race.  A convict ship came in from England last night, the Surry, sailed 17th July.  No particular news, except that the Coronation was positively to take place on the 8th of September.

If you have anything to send to Head Quarters the bearer will bring it for you.

Believe me, my dear Major,

With the most sincere wishes for your success,

very truly yours,

(Signed) J.D.  FORBES.

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Three Expeditions into the Interior of Eastern Australia, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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