The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 05 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 489 pages of information about The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 05.

The Archivarius now lifted the Golden Pot, and cried, with a strong voice, “Serpentina!  Serpentina!” But as the student Anselmus, joying in the destruction of the vile beldam who had hurried him into misfortune, cast his eyes on the Archivarius, behold, here stood once more the high majestic form of the Spirit-prince, looking up to him with indescribable dignity and grace.  “Anselmus,” said the Spirit-prince, “not thou, but a hostile Principle, which strove destructively to penetrate into thy nature and divide thee against thyself, was to blame for thy unbelief.  Thou hast kept thy faithfulness; be free and happy.”  A bright flash quivered through the spirit of Anselmus; the royal triphony of the crystal bells sounded stronger and louder than he had ever heard it; his nerves and fibres thrilled; but, swelling higher and higher, the melodious tones rang through the room; the glass which inclosed Anselmus broke; and he rushed into the arms of his dear and gentle Serpentina.

ELEVENTH VIGIL

Conrector Paulmann’s anger at the madness which had broken out in his Family.  How Registrator Heerbrand became Hofrat; and, in the keenest Frost, walked about in Shoes and silk Stockings.  Veronica’s Confessions.  Betrothment over the steaming Soup-dish.

“But tell me, best Registrator, how the cursed punch last night could so mount into our heads, and drive us to all manner of allotria?” So said Conrector Paulmann, as he next morning entered his room, which still lay full of broken sherds, and in whose midst his hapless peruke, dissolved into its original elements, was floating in the punch-bowl.  After the student Anselmus ran out of doors, Conrector Paulmann and Registrator Heerbrand had still kept trotting and hobbling up and down the room, shouting like maniacs, and butting their heads together; till Fraenzchen, with much labor, carried her vertiginous papa to bed, and Registrator Heerbrand, in the deepest exhaustion, sank on the sofa, which Veronica had left, taking refuge in her bedroom.  Registrator Heerbrand had his blue handkerchief tied about his head; he looked quite pale and melancholic, and moaned out:  “Ah, worthy Conrector, not the punch which Mam’sell Veronica most admirably brewed, no! but simply that cursed student is to blame for all the mischief.  Do you not observe that he has long been mente caphis?  And are you not aware that madness is infectious?  One fool makes twenty; pardon me, it is an old proverb; especially when you have drunk a glass or two, you fall into madness quite readily, and then involuntarily you manoeuvre, and go through your exercise, just as the crack-brained fugleman makes the motion.  Would you believe it, Conrector?  I am still giddy when I think of that gray Parrot!”

“Gray fiddlesticks!” interrupted the Conrector; “it was nothing but Archivarius Lindhorst’s little old Famulus, who had thrown a gray cloak over him and was seeking the student Anselmus.”

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The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 05 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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