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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 139 pages of information about The Radio Boys in the Thousand Islands.

“I was just discussing your case with a couple of friends,” Cub explained.  “We thought we might make a run down your way in a motor boat if you could give us a clear idea where your island is located.”

“I can’t give you any latitude and longitude,” was the “islander’s” reply.  “I was captured in my motor boat only a mile or two away from home.  Then I was blindfolded and put here on this island by the rascals.  It’s a small wooded island surrounded by several other small wooded islands, making it impossible for me to hail passing boats.  I will be glad to pay your expenses and enough more to make it worth your while if you will find me and get me away from here.”

“I don’t know how we’d find you without cruising among the Thousand Islands a week or two,” returned Cub.  “Have you a flag of distress flying?”

“It wouldn’t do any good.  Nobody would see it.”

“Oh, I have an idea!” suddenly exclaimed Hal, for he and Bud had put their receivers back on their ears when Cub began to communicate with “Mr. Crusoe” once more.

“Hold the wireless while I talk with my friends,” Cub directed to the fellow “at the other end of the ether”.  Then he removed the phones from his ears, and the other boys did likewise.

“Well, what’s your idea, Tee-hee?” the operator demanded with something of a tone of business challenge.

“Why, all we need is a radio compass,” Hal replied.  “You know I made one last summer, although I didn’t have much use for it.  We can install it on the boat and make a bee line for that fellow’s island if he keeps his spark busy to guide us.”

“Good!” exclaimed Bud.  “That’ll settle the biggest problem before us.”

“Yes,” Cub agreed.  “You’re a regular Thomas Edison, Jr., Tee-hee.  I think we’ll have to elect you captain of this expedition.”

“If we make it,” Bud conditioned with a slightly skeptical grin.

“My opinion, if it’s worth anything to you guys,” said Cub; “is that we’d better map out our plan thoroughly before we say anything about it to our fathers.  Then we can put our arguments in convincing manner.”

“We must finish our plan to-night, for we ought to start not later than Wednesday morning,” Bud argued.  “That’ll give us one day to get ready in.”

“We’ll need all that,” said Hal.  “Now, let’s get busy, boys, and see how near our plan is finished.  It’s after 10 o’clock, and I’ll have to go pretty soon.  If we go, we’ll need—­”

“Some food,” itemized Bud.

“Yes, enough for us and to feed a starving Robinson Crusoe,” amended Cub, beginning the list on a fresh sheet of paper.

“And drinking water.”

“No. 2,” commented Cub, as he jotted it down.

“And we ought to have a wireless set on hand,” Hal suggested.

“Sure,” said Cub.  “You bring that and your loop aerial.  This set is too big to transfer on board very well.”

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