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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 277 pages of information about The New North.
The flour mill at Vermilion-on-the-Peace
Articles made by Indians
The Hudson’s Bay Store
Papillon, a Beaver brave
Going to school in winter
My premier moose
Beaver camp, on Paddle River
The site of old Fort McLeod
Jean Baptiste, pilot on the Peace
Fort Dunvegan on the Peace
Fort St. John on the Peace
Where King was arrested
Alec Kennedy with his two sons
Cannibal Louise, her little girl and Miss Cameron
A Peace River Pioneer
Three generations
A family at the Lesser Slave
A one-night stand
A rye field in Brandon, Manitoba
Charles M. Hays, President of the Grand Trunk Railway
William Mackenzie, President of the Canadian Northern Railway
Donald D. Maun, Vice-president of the Canadian Northern Railway
William Whyte, Second Vice-president of the Canadian Pacific Railway
In the wheat fields
Hon. Frank Oliver, Minister of the Interior
Threshing grain
Doukhobors threshing flax
Sir William Van Horne, first President of the Canadian Pacific Railway

[Illustration:  Map of the Author’s Route]

THE NEW NORTH

CHAPTER I

THE MENDICANTS REACH WINNIPEG

“We are as mendicants who wait
  Along the roadside in the sun. 
Tatters of yesterday and shreds
  Of morrow clothe us every one.

“And some are dotards, who believe
  And glory in the days of old;
While some are dreamers, harping still
  Upon an unknown age of gold.

“O foolish ones, put by your care! 
  Where wants are many, joys are few;
And at the wilding springs of peace,
  God keeps an open house for you.

“But there be others, happier few,
  The vagabondish sons of God,
Who know the by-ways and the flowers,
  And care not how the world may plod.”

Isn’t it Riley who says, “Ef you want something, an’ jest dead set a-longin’ fer it with both eyes wet, and tears won’t bring it, why, you try sweat”?  Well, we had tried sweat and longing for two years, with planning and hoping and the saving of nickels, and now we are off!

Shakespeare makes his man say, “I will run as far as God has any ground,” and that is our ambition.  We are to travel north and keep on going till we strike the Arctic,—­straight up through Canada.  Most writers who traverse The Dominion enter it at the Eastern portal and travel west by the C.P.R., following the line of least resistance till they reach the Pacific.  Then they go back to dear old England and tell the world all about Canada, their idea of the half-continent being Euclid’s conception of a straight line, “length without breadth.”

[Illustration:  Sir Wilfred Laurier]

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