The Tinguian eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 351 pages of information about The Tinguian.
   The leaves of the oling rustle and rattle. 
    Rattle, rattle, rustle and rattle. 
   The leaves of the bakan fall before time. 
    Fall, fall, fall before time. 
   The leaves of the anis (a low shrub) are not clean. 
    Clean, clean, not clean.

III.

   You play Mr. bat who fly by night. 
    Night, night, fly by night. 
   You play grasshopper whose back is concave. 
    Concave, concave, whose back is concave. 
   You play Bang-nga-an who shines like gold by the trail. 
    By the trail, by the trail, shines like gold by the trail. 
   You play onombek who hiccoughs. 
    Hiccough, hiccough, who hiccoughs. 
   You play dove who falls. 
    Falls, falls, who falls. 
   You play lagadan (a bird) who flees(?). 
    Flees, flees, who flees. 
   You play balgasi (?) who mourns for the dead. 
    Mourns, mourns, mourns for the dead.

IV.

   Betel-nut of the west which grows up like the gourd. 
    Grows up, grows up like the gourd. 
   Betel-nut of Balasibis which smiles when it is cut. (Literally—­is
   cut and smiles.)
    It smiles, it smiles, is cut, and smiles. 
   Betel-nut of Malapay which chuckles (like a woman) when it is cut. 
    Chuckles, chuckles, is cut, and chuckles. 
   Betel-nut of Malosak which laughs (like a man) when it is cut. 
    Laughs, laughs, is cut, and laughs. 
   Betel-nut of Tomo which climbs and grows. 
    Grows, grows, climbs, and grows.

V.

   Do not take the leaves of my lawed, who am rich. 
   Rich, rich, do not take lawed leaves. 
   The widower takes often the top (best) lawed of Alyo. 
   The widower, the widower, the widower takes often. 
   The lawed of the wooded hill the widow takes often. 
   The widow, the widow, the widow takes often. 
   The lawed of Sablang the maiden takes often. 
   The maiden, the maiden, the maiden takes often. 
   The lawed of Paway the hermit (country man) takes often. 
   The hermit, the hermit, the hermit takes often.

VI.

   Bamboo of Podayan, ever living, ever living. 
   Ever living, ever living, bamboo of Podayan. 
   Bamboo of Baliweyan sigh (literally “go wey”) when the wind blows. 
   Sigh, sigh, bamboo of Baliweyan. 
   Bamboo of Bataan, like the sunshine. 
   Sunshine, sunshine, bamboo of Bataan. 
   My cane of bamboo gives out a clang. 
   Clang, clang, gives out a clang. 
   Bamboo of Palai wave up and down. 
   Wave, wave, wave up and down.

VII.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Tinguian from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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