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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 248 pages of information about The Young Wireless OperatorAs a Fire Patrol.

What shortly followed was to send him to bed soon afterward as happy as the traditional lark.  For when Charley got into touch with Lew by wireless at the appointed time, Lew told him that the Wireless Patrol had met him, Lew, at the station in a body, with the news that funds for the battery had all been earned and the battery ordered; and that when he had told them of Charley’s situation, the club had voted unanimously and enthusiastically to send the battery to Charley for him to use as long as he needed it in the forest.

Furthermore, Lew informed him, Henry had been talking to the wireless men at the Frankfort station, and not only were they willing to work with him to protect the forest, but they were also sending an amplifier to Oakdale so that Charley would be sure to get their messages with the greatest distinctness.  The battery would be forwarded as soon as it reached the Wireless Club and had been inspected, and the amplifier would go with it.

No wonder that Charley rolled up in his blankets, with shining eyes, careless alike of cats and Collinses.  With the pup and the new battery he felt that he should indeed be in position to render efficient service to his forester and his ranger, both of whom he was coming to love, and to the grand old forest around him.

Chapter XVII

An Accident in the Wilderness

As though she also were pleased at Charley’s good fortune, Dame Nature smiled her best in the days that immediately followed.  The sun rose warm and grateful.  The forest was instinct with the spirit of spring, of new-born life, of hope eternal.  Wilderness birds sang in the branches.  The brook babbled and gurgled and ran madly down the slope.  The leaves overhead whispered of the new life that had come.  All the forest animals seemed filled with the joy of living.  And Charley was not a whit behind them.  His whole being thrilled with happiness.

Now he could see matters in their true light; or if his vision were a trifle clouded, the clouds were tinged with rose instead of black, as they had been previously.

Charley thanked Providence that he was just where he was.  In some respects an unusual boy, he was mentally no abler than many of his fellows.  He possessed a trueness of vision and an understanding of things that were, however, unusual in a lad of his age.  Always he had had to earn the things that he wanted.  And always he had been able, within reason, to get what he desired.  Early in life, therefore, he had come to understand that everything has its price, and that he who is willing to pay the price can get almost anything he wishes.  So now, instead of bewailing the fact that he was where he was, as many another lad would have done under the circumstances, he rejoiced.  He rejoiced because he had sense enough to understand that his opportunity was at hand, here in the forest, and now.

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