The Arabian Nights eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 333 pages of information about The Arabian Nights.

The next day the merchant began to settle his affairs, and first of all to pay his debts.  He gave presents to his friends, and large alms to the poor.  He set his slaves at liberty, and provided for his wife and children.  The year soon passed away, and he was obliged to depart.  When he tried to say good-bye he was quite overcome with grief, and with difficulty tore himself away.  At length he reached the place where he had first seen the genius, on the very day that he had appointed.  He dismounted, and sat down at the edge of the fountain, where he awaited the genius in terrible suspense.

Whilst he was thus waiting an old man leading a hind came towards him.  They greeted one another, and then the old man said to him, “May I ask, brother, what brought you to this desert place, where there are so many evil genii about?  To see these beautiful trees one would imagine it was inhabited, but it is a dangerous place to stop long in.”

The merchant told the old man why he was obliged to come there.  He listened in astonishment.

“This is a most marvellous affair.  I should like to be a witness of your interview with the genius.”  So saying he sat down by the merchant.

While they were talking another old man came up, followed by two black dogs.  He greeted them, and asked what they were doing in this place.  The old man who was leading the hind told him the adventure of the merchant and the genius.  The second old man had not sooner heard the story than he, too, decided to stay there to see what would happen.  He sat down by the others, and was talking, when a third old man arrived.  He asked why the merchant who was with them looked so sad.  They told him the story, and he also resolved to see what would pass between the genius and the merchant, so waited with the rest.

They soon saw in the distance a thick smoke, like a cloud of dust.  This smoke came nearer and nearer, and then, all at once, it vanished, and they saw the genius, who, without speaking to them, approached the merchant, sword in hand, and, taking him by the arm, said, “Get up and let me kill you as you killed my son.”

The merchant and the three old men began to weep and groan.

Then the old man leading the hind threw himself at the monster’s feet and said, “O Prince of the Genii, I beg of you to stay your fury and to listen to me.  I am going to tell you my story and that of the hind I have with me, and if you find it more marvellous than that of the merchant whom you are about to kill, I hope that you will do away with a third part of his punishment?”

The genius considered some time, and then he said, “Very well, I agree to this.”

The Story of the First Old Man and of the Hind

I am now going to begin my story (said the old man), so please attend.

This hind that you see with me is my wife.  We have no children of our own, therefore I adopted the son of a favorite slave, and determined to make him my heir.

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The Arabian Nights from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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