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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 333 pages of information about The Arabian Nights.

People in France and England knew almost nothing about “The Arabian Nights” till the reigns of Queen Anne and George I., when they were translated into French by Monsieur Galland.  Grown-up people were then very fond of fairy tales, and they thought these Arab stories the best that they had ever read.  They were delighted with Ghouls (who lived among the tombs) and Geni, who seemed to be a kind of ogres, and with Princesses who work magic spells, and with Peris, who are Arab fairies.  Sindbad had adventures which perhaps came out of the Odyssey of Homer; in fact, all the East had contributed its wonders, and sent them to Europe in one parcel.  Young men once made a noise at Monsieur Galland’s windows in the dead of night, and asked him to tell them one of his marvellous tales.  Nobody talked of anything but dervishes and vizirs, rocs and peris.  The stories were translated from French into all languages, and only Bishop Atterbury complained that the tales were not likely to be true, and had no moral.  The bishop was presently banished for being on the side of Prince Charlie’s father, and had leisure to repent of being so solemn.

In this book “The Arabian Nights” are translated from the French version of Monsieur Galland, who dropped out the poetry and a great deal of what the Arabian authors thought funny, though it seems wearisome to us.  In this book the stories are shortened here and there, and omissions are made of pieces only suitable for Arabs and old gentlemen.  The translations are by the writers of the tales in the Fairy Books, and the pictures are by Mr. Ford.

I can remember reading “The Arabian Nights” when I was six years old, in dirty yellow old volumes of small type with no pictures, and I hope children who read them with Mr. Ford’s pictures will be as happy as I was then in the company of Aladdin and Sindbad the Sailor.

The Arabian Nights

In the chronicles of the ancient dynasty of the Sassanidae, who reigned for about four hundred years, from Persia to the borders of China, beyond the great river Ganges itself, we read the praises of one of the kings of this race, who was said to be the best monarch of his time.  His subjects loved him, and his neighbors feared him, and when he died he left his kingdom in a more prosperous and powerful condition than any king had done before him.

The two sons who survived him loved each other tenderly, and it was a real grief to the elder, Schahriar, that the laws of the empire forbade him to share his dominions with his brother Schahzeman.  Indeed, after ten years, during which this state of things had not ceased to trouble him, Schahriar cut off the country of Great Tartary from the Persian Empire and made his brother king.

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