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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 333 pages of information about The Arabian Nights.

The husband, who knew that it had neither rained nor thundered in the night, was convinced that the parrot was not speaking the truth, so he took him out of the cage and threw him so roughly on the ground that he killed him.  Nevertheless he was sorry afterwards, for he found that the parrot had spoken the truth.

“When the Greek king,” said the fisherman to the genius, “had finished the story of the parrot, he added to the vizir, “And so, vizir, I shall not listen to you, and I shall take care of the physician, in case I repent as the husband did when he had killed the parrot.”  But the vizir was determined.  “Sire,” he replied, “the death of the parrot was nothing.  But when it is a question of the life of a king it is better to sacrifice the innocent than save the guilty.  It is no uncertain thing, however.  The physician, Douban, wishes to assassinate you.  My zeal prompts me to disclose this to your Majesty.  If I am wrong, I deserve to be punished as a vizir was once punished.”  “What had the vizir done,” said the Greek king, “to merit the punishment?” “I will tell your Majesty, if you will do me the honour to listen,” answered the vizir.”

The Story of the Vizir Who Was Punished

There was once upon a time a king who had a son who was very fond of hunting.  He often allowed him to indulge in this pastime, but he had ordered his grand-vizir always to go with him, and never to lose sight of him.  One day the huntsman roused a stag, and the prince, thinking that the vizir was behind, gave chase, and rode so hard that he found himself alone.  He stopped, and having lost sight of it, he turned to rejoin the vizir, who had not been careful enough to follow him.  But he lost his way.  Whilst he was trying to find it, he saw on the side of the road a beautiful lady who was crying bitterly.  He drew his horse’s rein, and asked her who she was and what she was doing in this place, and if she needed help.  “I am the daughter of an Indian king,” she answered, “and whilst riding in the country I fell asleep and tumbled off.  My horse has run away, and I do not know what has become of him.”

The young prince had pity on her, and offered to take her behind him, which he did.  As they passed by a ruined building the lady dismounted and went in.  The prince also dismounted and followed her.  To his great surprise, he heard her saying to some one inside, “Rejoice my children; I am bringing you a nice fat youth.”  And other voices replied, “Where is he, mamma, that we may eat him at once, as we are very hungry?”

The prince at once saw the danger he was in.  He now knew that the lady who said she was the daughter of an Indian king was an ogress, who lived in desolate places, and who by a thousand wiles surprised and devoured passers-by.  He was terrified, and threw himself on his horse.  The pretended princess appeared at this moment, and seeing that she had lost her prey, she said to him, “Do not be afraid.  What do you want?”

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