The Arabian Nights eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 333 pages of information about The Arabian Nights.

“After having conferred such benefits on you,” said he, “I am loth indeed to work you such evil.  Think what it is to be blind, and do not force me to do what you will repent as long as you live.”

It was of no use.  “My brother,” I said firmly, “pray say no more, but do what I ask.  You have most generously responded to my wishes up to this time, do not spoil my recollection of you for a thing of such little consequence.  Let what will happen I take it on my own head, and will never reproach you.”

“Since you are determined upon it,” he answered with a sigh, “there is no use talking,” and taking the ointment he laid some on my right eye, which was tight shut.  When I tried to open it heavy clouds of darkness floated before me.  I was as blind as you see me now!

“Miserable dervish!” I shrieked, “so it is true after all!  Into what a bottomless pit has my lust after gold plunged me.  Ah, now that my eyes are closed they are really opened.  I know that all my sufferings are caused by myself alone!  But, good brother, you, who are so kind and charitable, and know the secrets of such vast learning, have you nothing that will give me back my sight?”

“Unhappy man,” replied the dervish, “it is not my fault that this has befallen you, but it is a just chastisement.  The blindness of your heart has wrought the blindness of your body.  Yes, I have secrets; that you have seen in the short time that we have known each other.  But I have none that will give you back your sight.  You have proved yourself unworthy of the riches that were given you.  Now they have passed into my hands, whence they will flow into the hands of others less greedy and ungrateful than you.”

The dervish said no more and left me, speechless with shame and confusion, and so wretched that I stood rooted to the spot, while he collected the eighty camels and proceeded on his way to Balsora.  It was in vain that I entreated him not to leave me, but at least to take me within reach of the first passing caravan.  He was deaf to my prayers and cries, and I should soon have been dead of hunger and misery if some merchants had not come along the track the following day and kindly brought me back to Bagdad.

From a rich man I had in one moment become a beggar; and up to this time I have lived solely on the alms that have been bestowed on me.  But, in order to expiate the sin of avarice, which was my undoing, I oblige each passer-by to give me a blow.

This, Commander of the Faithful, is my story.

When the blind man had ended the Caliph addressed him:  “Baba-Abdalla, truly your sin is great, but you have suffered enough.  Henceforth repent in private, for I will see that enough money is given you day by day for all your wants.”

At these words Baba-Abdalla flung himself at the Caliph’s feet, and prayed that honour and happiness might be his portion for ever.

The Story of Sidi-Nouman

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Project Gutenberg
The Arabian Nights from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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