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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 333 pages of information about The Arabian Nights.

Now, they were the vizir Giafar and his suite arriving at full speed from Bagdad.  For several days after Noureddin’s departure with the letter the Caliph had forgotten to send the express with the patent, without which the letter was useless.  Hearing a beautiful voice one day in the women’s part of the palace uttering lamentations, he was informed that it was the voice of the fair Persian, and suddenly calling to mind the patent, he sent for Giafar, and ordered him to make for Balsora with the utmost speed—­ if Noureddin were dead, to hang Saouy; if he were still alive, to bring him at once to Bagdad along with the king and Saouy.

Giafar rode at full speed through the square, and alighted at the steps of the palace, where the king came to greet him.  The vizir’s first question was whether Noureddin were still alive.  The king replied that he was, and he was immediately led forth, though bound hand and foot.  By the vizir’s orders his bonds were immediately undone, and Saouy was tied with the same cords.  Next day Giafar returned to Bagdad, bearing with him the king, Saouy, and Noureddin.

When the Caliph heard what treatment Noureddin had received, he authorised him to behead Saouy with his own hands, but he declined to shed the blood of his enemy, who was forthwith handed over to the executioner.  The Caliph also desired Noureddin to reign over Balsora, but this, too, he declined, saying that after what had passed there he preferred never to return, but to enter the service of the Caliph.  He became one of his most intimate courtiers, and lived long in great happiness with the fair Persian.  As to the king, the Caliph contented himself with sending him back to Balsora, with the recommendation to be more careful in future in the choice of his vizir.

Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp

There once lived a poor tailor, who had a son called Aladdin, a careless, idle boy who would do nothing but play all day long in the streets with little idle boys like himself.  This so grieved the father that he died; yet, in spite of his mother’s tears and prayers, Aladdin did not mend his ways.  One day, when he was playing in the streets as usual, a stranger asked him his age, and if he were not the son of Mustapha the tailor.

“I am, sir,” replied Aladdin; “but he died a long while ago.”

On this the stranger, who was a famous African magician, fell on his neck and kissed him, saying:  “I am your uncle, and knew you from your likeness to my brother.  Go to your mother and tell her I am coming.”

Aladdin ran home, and told his mother of his newly found uncle.

“Indeed, child,” she said, “your father had a brother, but I always thought he was dead.”

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