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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 156 pages of information about Cobwebs from an Empty Skull.

Brandate of Sodium 9.50 parts. 
Sulphuretted Hydrogen 3.50 "
Citrate of Magnesia 15.00 "
Calves’-foot Jelly 10.00 "
Protocarbonate of Brass 11.00 "
Nitric Acid 7.50 "
Devonshire Cream 6.00 "
Treaclate of Soap 2.00 "
Robur 3.50 "
Superheated Mustard 11.50 "
Frogs 20.45 "
Traces of Guano, Leprosy, Picallilly,
  and Scotch Whiskey .05 "

Temperature of the four baths, 117 degrees each—­or 468 altogether.

* * * * *

THE FOLLOWING DORG.

Dad Petto, as everybody called him, had a dog, upon whom he lavished an amount of affection which, had it been disbursed in a proper quarter, would have been adequate to the sentimental needs of a dozen brace of lovers.  The name of this dog was Jerusalem, but it might more properly have been Dan-to-Beersheba.  He was not a fascinating dog to look at; you can buy a handsomer dog in any shop than this one.  He had neither a graceful exterior nor an engaging address.  On the contrary, his exceptional plainness had passed into a local proverb; and such was the inbred coarseness of his demeanour, that in the dark you might have thought him a politician.

If you will take two very bandy-legged curs, cut one off just abaft the shoulders, and the other immediately forward of the haunches, rejecting the fore-part of the first and the rear portion of the second, you will have the raw material for constructing a dog something like Dad Petto’s.  You have only to effect a junction between the accepted sections, and make the thing eat.

Had he been favoured with as many pairs of legs as a centipede, Jerusalem would not have differed materially from either of his race; but it was odd to see such a wealth of dog wedded to such a poverty of leg.  He was so long that the most precocious pupil of the public schools could not have committed him to memory in a week.

It was beautiful to see Jerusalem rounding the angle of a wall, and turning his head about to observe how the remainder of the procession was coming on.  He was once circumnavigating a small out-house, when, catching sight of his own hinder-quarters, he flew into a terrible rage.  The sight of another dog always had this effect upon Jerusalem, and more especially when, as in this case, he thought he could grasp an unfair advantage.  So Jerusalem took after that retreating foe as hard as ever he could hook it.  Round and round he flew, but the faster he went, the more his centrifugal force widened his circle, until he presently lost sight of his enemy altogether.  Then he slowed down, determined to accomplish his

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