Cobwebs from an Empty Skull eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 156 pages of information about Cobwebs from an Empty Skull.

That is how Spanish vengeance was balked of its issue.

* * * * *

MRS. DENNISON’S HEAD.

While I was employed in the Bank of Loan and Discount (said Mr. Applegarth, smiling the smile with which he always prefaced a nice old story), there was another clerk there, named Dennison—­a quiet, reticent fellow, the very soul of truth, and a great favourite with us all.  He always wore crape on his hat, and once when asked for whom he was in mourning he replied his wife, and seemed much affected.  We all expressed our sympathy as delicately as possible, and no more was said upon the subject.  Some weeks after this he seemed to have arrived at that stage of tempered grief at which it becomes a relief to give sorrow words—­to speak of the departed one to sympathizing friends; for one day he voluntarily began talking of his bereavement, and of the terrible calamity by which his wife had been deprived of her head!

This sharpened our curiosity to the keenest edge; but of course we controlled it, hoping he would volunteer some further information with regard to so singular a misfortune; but when day after day went by and he did not allude to the matter, we got worked up into a fever of excitement about it.  One evening after Dennison had gone, we held a kind of political meeting about it, at which all possible and impossible methods of decapitation were suggested as the ones to which Mrs. D. probably owed her extraordinary demise.  I am sorry to add that we so far forgot the grave character of the event as to lay small wagers that it was done this way or that way; that it was accidental or premeditated; that she had had a hand in it herself or that it was wrought by circumstances beyond her control.  All was mere conjecture, however; but from that time Dennison, as the custodian of a secret upon which we had staked our cash, was an object of more than usual interest.  It wasn’t entirely that, either; aside from our paltry wagers, we felt a consuming curiosity to know the truth for its own sake.  Each set himself to work to elicit the dread secret in some way; and the misdirected ingenuity we developed was wonderful.  All sorts of pious devices were resorted to to entice poor Dennison into clearing up the mystery.  By a thousand indirect methods we sought to entrap him into divulging all.  History, fiction, poesy—­all were laid under contribution, and from Goliah down, through Charles I., to Sam Spigger, a local celebrity who got his head entangled in mill machinery, every one who had ever mourned the loss of a head received his due share of attention during office hours.  The regularity with which we introduced, and the pertinacity with which we stuck to, this one topic came near getting us all discharged; for one day the cashier came out of his private office and intimated that if we valued our situations the subject of hanging would afford us the means of retaining them.  He added that he always selected his subordinates with an eye to their conversational abilities, but variety of subject was as desirable, at times, as exhaustive treatment.

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Cobwebs from an Empty Skull from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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