The Mysterious Island eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 706 pages of information about The Mysterious Island.

“What do you want, my friend?” asked the engineer, as if he had returned from the land of dreams.

“The torches will soon go out.”

“Forward!” replied Cyrus Harding.

The little band left the cavern and began to ascend through the dark passage.  Top closed the rear, still growling every now and then.  The ascent was painful enough.  The settlers rested a few minutes in the upper grotto, which made a sort of landing-place halfway up the long granite staircase.  Then they began to climb again.

Soon fresher air was felt.  The drops of water, dried by evaporation, no longer sparkled on the walls.  The flaring torches began to grow dim.  The one which Neb carried went out, and if they did not wish to find their way in the dark, they must hasten.

This was done, and a little before four o’clock, at the moment when the sailor’s torch went out in its turn, Cyrus Harding and his companions passed out of the passage.

Chapter 19

The next day, the 22nd of May, the arrangement of their new dwelling was commenced.  In fact, the settlers longed to exchange the insufficient shelter of the Chimneys for this large and healthy retreat, in the midst of solid rock, and sheltered from the water both of the sea and sky.  Their former dwelling was not, however, to be entirely abandoned, for the engineer intended to make a manufactory of it for important works.  Cyrus Harding’s first care was to find out the position of the front of Granite House from the outside.  He went to the beach, and as the pickaxe when it escaped from the hands of the reporter must have fallen perpendicularly to the foot of the cliff, the finding it would be sufficient to show the place where the hole had been pierced in the granite.

The pickaxe was easily found, and the hole could be seen in a perpendicular line above the spot where it was stuck in the sand.  Some rock pigeons were already flying in and out of the narrow opening; they evidently thought that Granite House had been discovered on purpose for them.  It was the engineer’s intention to divide the right portion of the cavern into several rooms, preceded by an entrance passage, and to light it by means of five windows and a door, pierced in the front.  Pencroft was much pleased with the five windows, but he could not understand the use of the door, since the passage offered a natural staircase, through which it would always be easy to enter Granite House.

“My friend,” replied Harding, “if it is easy for us to reach our dwelling by this passage, it will be equally easy for others besides us.  I mean, on the contrary, to block up that opening, to seal it hermetically, and, if it is necessary, to completely hide the entrance by making a dam, and thus causing the water of the lake to rise.”

“And how shall we get in?” asked the sailor.

“By an outside ladder,” replied Cyrus Harding, “a rope ladder, which, once drawn up, will render access to our dwelling impossible.”

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Mysterious Island from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook