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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 334 pages of information about An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Volume 2.

These wearing at present a very promising appearance, and the various and unforeseen misfortunes which had from time to time attended the exertions of the industrious in agriculture, being, it was hoped, now at an end, the governor, conceiving it to be no longer consistent with his duty to continue the original prices of grain, directed that in future the following should be given, viz, for wheat, per bushel, 8 shillings; for the present barley, per bushel, 6 shillings; and for maize, per bushel, 4 shillings which prices were to commence on the 1st day of January 1800.

The scarcity of wheat in the public store was occasioned by the unbounded extravagance of the labouring people, who had, in consequence of the last unproductive season, reduced those who supported themselves to very great distress; and several persons, who some time since would gladly have sent their wheat to the store at the established price, had now refused it, when the store was capable of receiving it; and, taking advantage of the scarcity which they themselves had occasioned, had raised the price of wheat to L1 10s per bushel:  a shameful extortion!

CHAPTER XXII

The Reliance sails for Norfolk Island
The Walker arrives with Lieutenant-Colonel Paterson from England
Dispatches received
Orders respecting bread
Transactions
Regulations
Storm of wind
December
The Britannia whaler sails for England
Settlers dissatisfied
A Spanish prize arrives
The Martha from Cape Barren Island
A criminal court held
Wheat continued at the former Price
Gaol burnt at Parramatta
Harvest begun
Live stock

November.] On the 2nd of the month, his Majesty’s ship the Reliance sailed with the relief of the military on duty at Norfolk Island; and in the afternoon of the following day the ship Walker anchored in the Cove from England.  On board of this ship were Lieutenant-Colonel Paterson, and Captain Abbot, of the New South Wales corps.

Dispatches were at this time received, whereby the governor, being directed to cause a register to be kept of all ships entering inwards and clearing outwards of the harbour, he appointed Richard Atkins, esq to the service; and it became an article in the port orders which were delivered to the masters of ships upon their arrival, that they were not upon any account to break bulk, or attempt to land any article whatever, until such time as an account of the ship, her commander, cargo, etc. had been laid before the governor.  It was at the same time signified, that no boat, or any person whomsoever, except the pilot, such officer as might be sent by the governor, and the person appointed to fill up the register, should ever board strange ships entering the port, until the above information had been regularly and fully obtained.  It was conjectured, that this measure of registering ships was preparatory to the establishment of duties and a custom-house.

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