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Queen Victoria eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 262 pages of information about Queen Victoria.

At Frogmore, the great mausoleum, perpetually enriched, was visited almost daily by the Queen when the Court was at Windsor.  But there was another, a more secret and a hardly less holy shrine.  The suite of rooms which Albert had occupied in the Castle was kept for ever shut away from the eyes of any save the most privileged.  Within those precincts everything remained as it had been at the Prince’s death; but the mysterious preoccupation of Victoria had commanded that her husband’s clothing should be laid afresh, each evening, upon the bed, and that, each evening, the water should be set ready in the basin, as if he were still alive; and this incredible rite was performed with scrupulous regularity for nearly forty years.

Such was the inner worship; and still the flesh obeyed the spirit; still the daily hours of labour proclaimed Victoria’s consecration to duty and to the ideal of the dead.  Yet, with the years, the sense of self-sacrifice faded; the natural energies of that ardent being discharged themselves with satisfaction into the channel of public work; the love of business which, from her girlhood, had been strong within her, reasserted itself in all its vigour, and, in her old age, to have been cut off from her papers and her boxes would have been, not a relief, but an agony to Victoria.  Thus, though toiling Ministers might sigh and suffer, the whole process of government continued, till the very end, to pass before her.  Nor was that all; ancient precedent had made the validity of an enormous number of official transactions dependent upon the application of the royal sign-manual; and a great proportion of the Queen’s working hours was spent in this mechanical task.  Nor did she show any desire to diminish it.  On the contrary, she voluntarily resumed the duty of signing commissions in the army, from which she had been set free by Act of Parliament, and from which, during the years of middle life, she had abstained.  In no case would she countenance the proposal that she should use a stamp.  But, at last, when the increasing pressure of business made the delays of the antiquated system intolerable, she consented that, for certain classes of documents, her oral sanction should be sufficient.  Each paper was read aloud to her, and she said at the end “Approved.”  Often, for hours at a time, she would sit, with Albert’s bust in front of her, while the word “Approved” issued at intervals from her lips.  The word came forth with a majestic sonority; for her voice now—­how changed from the silvery treble of her girlhood—­was a contralto, full and strong.

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