Analyzing Character eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 399 pages of information about Analyzing Character.

SOME PRACTICAL RESULTS

In one of the first organizations where the Blackford Employment Plan was installed there were employed about 2,500 men and women.  At the time of the adoption of this plan the various foremen and superintendents in the plant were hiring about 6,600 new employees each year in order to maintain their regular working force of 2,500.  Within six months new employees were being taken on at the rate of only 4,080 a year—­and this notwithstanding the fact that many changes were necessitated by sweeping reorganization and adoption of new methods of manufacture in the industry.

Excellent results were obtained in reassignment of executives as the result of a careful analysis of those holding positions when the department was installed.  One executive instantly recognized as being clever, designing, and essentially dishonest was replaced by another of a reliable, efficient type.  Under the new executive, the department more than doubled its output, at the same time cutting the payroll of the department down to 43 per cent of its former size.  Still another executive, holding a position of highest trust and responsibility, was reported upon adversely after analysis by the employment department.  An investigation made as the result of this report revealed serious irregularities covering a long period of months.  Another man properly qualified for the position was selected by the department, and immediately began to effect noticeable savings, as well as greatly increasing the value of the department’s work in the institution.  Still another executive selected by this department increased the output of one of the shops by 120 per cent, with a very slight increase in the payroll.  In another organization, careful records showed that among employees selected according to this plan, 90 per cent were efficient, satisfactory, and permanent; 8 per cent fairly satisfactory but not permanent; and 2 per cent unsatisfactory and discharged.

AN UNUSUAL HARMONY OF JUDGMENT

But these results, while desirable, are not wholly convincing.  It is easy enough to explain them on the ground that any man or woman of common sense, keen observation and good judgment, devoting all his or her intelligence and time to employment problems, might have gained the same results without using a method for determining aptitudes and character from an observation of physical characteristics.

More specific and more convincing evidence may be found in a series of incidents which occurred in connection with an employment department established in a textile factory, employing twelve hundred men, located in New England.  The supervisor of this department is a young man who has been a student and practitioner of this method in employment work since August, 1912.  Previously to taking up this work, he had taken an engineer’s degree and had some experience as an executive, in a large factory.

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Analyzing Character from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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