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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 567 pages of information about Jane Eyre.

“Nonsense!  But you are rather put upon, that’s certain.  My mother said, when she came to see me last week, that she would not like a little one of her own to be in your place. —­ Now, come in, and I’ve some good news for you.”

“I don’t think you have, Bessie.”

“Child! what do you mean?  What sorrowful eyes you fix on me!  Well, but Missis and the young ladies and Master John are going out to tea this afternoon, and you shall have tea with me.  I’ll ask cook to bake you a little cake, and then you shall help me to look over your drawers; for I am soon to pack your trunk.  Missis intends you to leave Gateshead in a day or two, and you shall choose what toys you like to take with you.”

“Bessie, you must promise not to scold me any more till I go.”

“Well, I will; but mind you are a very good girl, and don’t be afraid of me.  Don’t start when I chance to speak rather sharply; it’s so provoking.”

“I don’t think I shall ever be afraid of you again, Bessie, because I have got used to you, and I shall soon have another set of people to dread.”

“If you dread them they’ll dislike you.”

“As you do, Bessie?”

“I don’t dislike you, Miss; I believe I am fonder of you than of all the others.”

“You don’t show it.”

“You little sharp thing! you’ve got quite a new way of talking.  What makes you so venturesome and hardy?”

“Why, I shall soon be away from you, and besides” —­ I was going to say something about what had passed between me and Mrs. Reed, but on second thoughts I considered it better to remain silent on that head.

“And so you’re glad to leave me?”

“Not at all, Bessie; indeed, just now I’m rather sorry.”

“Just now! and rather!  How coolly my little lady says it!  I dare say now if I were to ask you for a kiss you wouldn’t give it me:  you’d say you’d rather not.”

“I’ll kiss you and welcome:  bend your head down.”  Bessie stooped; we mutually embraced, and I followed her into the house quite comforted.  That afternoon lapsed in peace and harmony; and in the evening Bessie told me some of her most enchanting stories, and sang me some of her sweetest songs.  Even for me life had its gleams of sunshine.

CHAPTER V

Five o’clock had hardly struck on the morning of the 19th of January, when Bessie brought a candle into my closet and found me already up and nearly dressed.  I had risen half-an-hour before her entrance, and had washed my face, and put on my clothes by the light of a half-moon just setting, whose rays streamed through the narrow window near my crib.  I was to leave Gateshead that day by a coach which passed the lodge gates at six a.m.  Bessie was the only person yet risen; she had lit a fire in the nursery, where she now proceeded to make my breakfast.  Few children can eat when excited with the thoughts of a journey; nor could I. Bessie, having pressed me in vain to take a few spoonfuls of the boiled milk and bread she had prepared for me, wrapped up some biscuits in a paper and put them into my bag; then she helped me on with my pelisse and bonnet, and wrapping herself in a shawl, she and I left the nursery.  As we passed Mrs. Reed’s bedroom, she said, “Will you go in and bid Missis good-bye?”

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