Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 567 pages of information about Jane Eyre.

The rain rushed down.  He hurried me up the walk, through the grounds, and into the house; but we were quite wet before we could pass the threshold.  He was taking off my shawl in the hall, and shaking the water out of my loosened hair, when Mrs. Fairfax emerged from her room.  I did not observe her at first, nor did Mr. Rochester.  The lamp was lit.  The clock was on the stroke of twelve.

“Hasten to take off your wet things,” said he; “and before you go, good-night —­ good-night, my darling!”

He kissed me repeatedly.  When I looked up, on leaving his arms, there stood the widow, pale, grave, and amazed.  I only smiled at her, and ran upstairs.  “Explanation will do for another time,” thought I. Still, when I reached my chamber, I felt a pang at the idea she should even temporarily misconstrue what she had seen.  But joy soon effaced every other feeling; and loud as the wind blew, near and deep as the thunder crashed, fierce and frequent as the lightning gleamed, cataract-like as the rain fell during a storm of two hours’ duration, I experienced no fear and little awe.  Mr. Rochester came thrice to my door in the course of it, to ask if I was safe and tranquil:  and that was comfort, that was strength for anything.

Before I left my bed in the morning, little Adele came running in to tell me that the great horse-chestnut at the bottom of the orchard had been struck by lightning in the night, and half of it split away.

CHAPTER XXIV

As I rose and dressed, I thought over what had happened, and wondered if it were a dream.  I could not be certain of the reality till I had seen Mr. Rochester again, and heard him renew his words of love and promise.

While arranging my hair, I looked at my face in the glass, and felt it was no longer plain:  there was hope in its aspect and life in its colour; and my eyes seemed as if they had beheld the fount of fruition, and borrowed beams from the lustrous ripple.  I had often been unwilling to look at my master, because I feared he could not be pleased at my look; but I was sure I might lift my face to his now, and not cool his affection by its expression.  I took a plain but clean and light summer dress from my drawer and put it on:  it seemed no attire had ever so well become me, because none had I ever worn in so blissful a mood.

I was not surprised, when I ran down into the hall, to see that a brilliant June morning had succeeded to the tempest of the night; and to feel, through the open glass door, the breathing of a fresh and fragrant breeze.  Nature must be gladsome when I was so happy.  A beggar-woman and her little boy —­ pale, ragged objects both —­ were coming up the walk, and I ran down and gave them all the money I happened to have in my purse —­ some three or four shillings:  good or bad, they must partake of my jubilee.  The rooks cawed, and blither birds sang; but nothing was so merry or so musical as my own rejoicing heart.

Follow Us on Facebook