Jane Eyre eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 705 pages of information about Jane Eyre.

“Yaas, to be sure I do,” drawled Lord Ingram; “and the poor old stick used to cry out ‘Oh you villains childs!’ —­ and then we sermonised her on the presumption of attempting to teach such clever blades as we were, when she was herself so ignorant.”

“We did; and, Tedo, you know, I helped you in prosecuting (or persecuting) your tutor, whey-faced Mr. Vining —­ the parson in the pip, as we used to call him.  He and Miss Wilson took the liberty of falling in love with each other —­ at least Tedo and I thought so; we surprised sundry tender glances and sighs which we interpreted as tokens of ‘la belle passion,’ and I promise you the public soon had the benefit of our discovery; we employed it as a sort of lever to hoist our dead-weights from the house.  Dear mama, there, as soon as she got an inkling of the business, found out that it was of an immoral tendency.  Did you not, my lady-mother?”

“Certainly, my best.  And I was quite right:  depend on that:  there are a thousand reasons why liaisons between governesses and tutors should never be tolerated a moment in any well-regulated house; firstly —­ "

“Oh, gracious, mama!  Spare us the enumeration!  Au reste, we all know them:  danger of bad example to innocence of childhood; distractions and consequent neglect of duty on the part of the attached —­ mutual alliance and reliance; confidence thence resulting —­ insolence accompanying —­ mutiny and general blow-up.  Am I right, Baroness Ingram, of Ingram Park?”

“My lily-flower, you are right now, as always.”

“Then no more need be said:  change the subject.”

Amy Eshton, not hearing or not heeding this dictum, joined in with her soft, infantine tone:  “Louisa and I used to quiz our governess too; but she was such a good creature, she would bear anything:  nothing put her out.  She was never cross with us; was she, Louisa?”

“No, never:  we might do what we pleased; ransack her desk and her workbox, and turn her drawers inside out; and she was so good-natured, she would give us anything we asked for.”

“I suppose, now,” said Miss Ingram, curling her lip sarcastically, “we shall have an abstract of the memoirs of all the governesses extant:  in order to avert such a visitation, I again move the introduction of a new topic.  Mr. Rochester, do you second my motion?”

“Madam, I support you on this point, as on every other.”

“Then on me be the onus of bringing it forward.  Signior Eduardo, are you in voice to-night?”

“Donna Bianca, if you command it, I will be.”

“Then, signior, I lay on you my sovereign behest to furbish up your lungs and other vocal organs, as they will be wanted on my royal service.”

“Who would not be the Rizzio of so divine a Mary?”

“A fig for Rizzio!” cried she, tossing her head with all its curls, as she moved to the piano.  “It is my opinion the fiddler David must have been an insipid sort of fellow; I like black Bothwell better:  to my mind a man is nothing without a spice of the devil in him; and history may say what it will of James Hepburn, but I have a notion, he was just the sort of wild, fierce, bandit hero whom I could have consented to gift with my hand.”

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Jane Eyre from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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