The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 08 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 508 pages of information about The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 08.
it being not the first offense.  They agree to a plan, devised by the malicious neighbor, to let the entire penalty fall on Uli’s head, so that they can go scot-free.  Uli is to confess himself the guilty party, and in return for this service the others, all wealthy farmers’ sons, will reimburse him for all expenses and give him a handsome bonus besides.  Uli’s master overhears his neighbor talking to Uli, decides to interfere, and points out to him the noose into which he is running his head.  He advises Uli to demand a written promise, signed by all, that they will do what has been agreed upon.  Uli brings home the written promise and shows it to his master; it turns out to be nothing but a certificate that Uli is the guilty party.  Uli is in consternation; but the master promises to help him out if he will abide by his word in the future.  Accordingly, Johannes meets the scheming neighbor and advises him to have the other players settle up and leave Uli in peace, or else Uli may have occasion to show the paper to the governor.  Uli hears nothing more about the affair.]

CHAPTER VII

HOW THE MASTER KINDLES A FIRE FOR THE GOOD SEED

[The author points out the disastrous consequences of giving the servants on a farm only unheated rooms to live in, and no access to the warm house; on Sundays they seek warmth in the public-houses or elsewhere, and terrible immorality results.  Uli feels the need of a warm room to sit in, and the master invites him into the house.  The maids are at first much put out, and the mistress too; but the master upholds Uli, and gradually the new custom wins favor and results in a betterment of all the servants.]

CHAPTER VIII

A SERVANT BECOMES PROSPEROUS AND SOON THE SPECULATORS APPEAR

[Uli becomes quite settled in steady habits, and soon has a nice little sum of money in hand.  But others get wind of it, and they borrow various sums of him, promising to pay back at a certain time with interest.  Soon Uli’s money is all gone, but he exults in the thought of his interest.  When the time for payment comes the debtors make excuses; and as time goes on and no money is forthcoming, Uli becomes anxious.  At length the master notices his distress, finds out the trouble, and helps him to recover most of what he had lent, admonishing him hereafter to put his savings in the bank.]

CHAPTER IX

ULI GAINS PRESTIGE AND IMPRESSES GIRLS

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The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 08 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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