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Narrative of the Voyage of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By the Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During the Years 1846-1850. eBook

John MacGillivray
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 302 pages of information about Narrative of the Voyage of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By the Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During the Years 1846-1850..

COLUMN 1:  ENGLISH. 
COLUMN 2:  EASTERN TASMANIAN.

Eye :  lepe-na
Ear :  pelverata. 
Elbow :  rowella
Foot :  langa-na
Fist :  trew
Head :  pathe-na-naddi
Hair :  cetha-na
Hand :  anama-na = nema-da, Brumer I.
Knee :  nannabena-na. 
Leg :  lathana-ma
Teeth :  yan-na = yinge-da, Brierly I.
Tongue :  me-na = mime-na, Brumer I.
Chin :  came-na. 
Neck :  lepera. 
Breast :  wagley.

Here, the number of other words ending in na is very considerable; so considerable that, if it were not for the cumulative evidence derived from other quarters, it would be doubtful whether the na could legitimately be considered as a possessive affix at all.  It MAY, however, be so even in the present instance.

To these we may add two lists from the Lobo and Utanata dialects of the south-western coast of New Guinea.

COLUMN 1:  ENGLISH. 
COLUMN 2:  UTANATA. 
COLUMN 3:  LOBO.

Arms :  too :  nima-ngo. 
Back :  urimi :  rusuko-ngo. 
Beard :  — :  minooro. 
Belly :  imauw :  kanboro-ngo. 
Breast, female :  auw :  gingo-ngo. 
Breast, male :  paiety :  gingo-ngo
Cheeks :  awamu :  wafiwirio-ngo. 
Ears :  ianie :  -. 
Eyebrows :  — :  matato-ngo-wuru. 
Eyes :  mame :  matatoto-ngo. 
Fingers :  — :  nima-ngo-sori. 
Foot :  mouw :  kai-ngo. 
Hands :  toe-mare :  nima-ngo-uta. 
Hair :  oeirie :  mono-ng-furu. 
Head :  oepauw :  mono-ngo or umum. 
Knee :  iripu :  kai-ngo-woko. 
Mouth :  irie :  orie-ngo. 
Nose :  birimboe :  sikaio-ngo. 
Neck :  ema :  gara-ng. 
Tongue :  mare :  kario-ngo. 
Thigh :  ai :  willanima. 
Teeth :  titi :  riwoto-ngo. 
Toes :  — :  nisora.

Finally, we have the long, and evidently compound forms of p** in the Corio, Colack, and other Australian dialects; long and evidently compound forms which no hypothesis so readily explains as that of the possessive adjunct; a phenomenon which future investigation many show to be equally Oceanic and American.

...

APPENDIX 4.

CATALOGUE OF THE BIRDS OF THE NORTH-EAST COAST OF AUSTRALIA AND TORRES STRAIT.

Lists exhibiting the occurrence of Australian Birds in particular districts are instructive, as showing the range of species over the various parts of an extensive district, and as bearing upon, and to my mind confirming, to a certain extent, the views of those geologists who consider Australia to have formerly appeared as a cluster of three or four islands, subsequently connected since the tertiary epoch so as to form what may now be considered as a continent.  With the kind assistance in determining the species of Mr. Gould, who has elsewhere published similar lists* of the birds of other parts of Australia, the annexed Catalogue has been made out.  All the species contained therein have passed under my own observation, and

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