Narrative of the Voyage of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By the Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During the Years 1846-1850. eBook

John MacGillivray
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 302 pages of information about Narrative of the Voyage of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By the Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During the Years 1846-1850..

8.  ADJECTIVES.

Another :  — :  nessao (b) :  -. 
More :  patana :  sagu :  -.

9.  ADVERBS, ETC.

Yes :  — :  ewa :  -. 
No, I have not, will not :  — :  nige :  -. 
No, I won’t, don’t! :  laasi :  besi (b) :  -. 
Presently, by and bye :  — :  tabu (h) :  tabu. 
Exclamations of surprise and astonishment :  — :  ao-o-o :  -. 
Exclamations of surprise and astonishment :  — :  dim-dim :  -.

10.  VERBS.

Break (a stick) :  udumuan :  — :  -. 
Come away :  — :  kurhama (D) :  -. 
Cough :  huwa :  oso (D) :  keli-keli. 
Cry :  tai :  — :  -. 
Dive :  hetai :  — :  -. 
Eat, eat it :  — :  oquai :  -. 
Give, give me :  mahi :  ureama (b) :  -. 
Go away, go back :  — :  — :  tadubi. 
Laugh :  kiri :  tanuwaraha :  -. 
Paddle :  oawde :  ow-wassi (b) :  -. 
Rise up :  — :  kotoro :  -. 
Sing :  — :  pediri (D) :  -. 
Sit down :  — :  kumturi :  -. 
Sleep :  mahuta :  — :  -. 
Sneeze :  — :  tatino (D) :  -. 
Strike (with fist) :  hela :  — :  -. 
Swim :  nahu :  — :  -. 
Whistle :  — :  ino :  -.

11.  MlSCELLANEOUS.

Expressing friendship :  — :  magasugo (b) :  -. 
This is called :  — :  taina esana :  -.

12.  NAMES OF PERSONS.

Males, Number 1 :  Woro :  Ihara :  Wadai. 
Males, Number 2 :  Iripa :  Nubaida :  Maho. 
Males, Number 3 :  Kari (father and son) :  Tubuda :  Hewawo. 
Males, Number 4 :  Baguya :  Eratao :  Mao. 
Females, Number 1 :  — :  Lataoma, Konaia (D) :  -. 
Females, Number 2 :  — :  Narumai, Tatarai (D) :  -. 
Females, Number 3 :  — :  Haraobi, Bonarua (D) :  -. 
Females, Number 4 :  — :  Perodi :  -. 
Females, Number 5 :  — :  Gubetta :  -.

...

APPENDIX 3.

REMARKS ON THE VOCABULARIES OF THE VOYAGE OF THE RATTLESNAKE, BY R.G. 
LATHAM, M.D.

In the way of comparative philology the most important part of the Grammar of the Australian languages is, generally, the Pronoun.  That of the Kowrarega language will, therefore, be the first point investigated.

In the tongues of the Indo-European class the personal pronouns are pre-eminently constant, i.e., they agree in languages which, in many other points, differ.  How thoroughly the sound of m runs through the Gothic, Slavonic, and Iranian tongues as the sign of the pronoun of the first person singular, in the oblique cases; how regularly a modification of t, s, or th, appears in such words as tu, su, thou, etc!  Now this constancy of the Pronoun exists in most languages; but not in an equally palpable and manifest form.  It is disguised in several ways.  Sometimes, as in the Indo-European tongues, there is one root for the nominative and one for the oblique cases; sometimes the same form, as in the Finlandic, runs through the whole declension; sometimes, as when we say you for thou in English, one number is substituted for another; and sometimes, as when the German says sie for thou, a change of the person is made as well.  When languages are known in detail, these complications can be guarded against; but where the tongue is but imperfectly exhibited a special analysis becomes requisite.

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Narrative of the Voyage of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By the Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During the Years 1846-1850. from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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