Narrative of the Voyage of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By the Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During the Years 1846-1850. eBook

John MacGillivray
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 302 pages of information about Narrative of the Voyage of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By the Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During the Years 1846-1850..
went on top of the hill and saw Cape York; I knew it was Cape York, because the sand did not go on further; I sat down then a good while; I said to myself, this is Port Albany, I believe inside somewhere; Mr. Kennedy also told me that the ship was inside, close up to the mainland; I went on a little way, and saw the ship and boat; I met close up here two black gins and a good many piccanninies; one said to me “powad, powad;” then I asked her for eggs, she gave me turtles’ eggs, and I gave her a burning-glass; she pointed to the ship which I had seen before; I was very frightened of seeing the black men all along here; and when I was on the rock cooeying, and murry murry glad when the boat came for me.

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DR. VALLACK’S STATEMENT.

A full account of proceedings taken by the Ariel, from the time of Jackey’s arrival at Cape York, on the 23rd December, 1848, up to the time of her departure from Weymouth Bay, on the 31st December, 1848.

Saturday, 23rd December, 1848.

About eight o’clock A.M., Captain Dobson called down to me, saying that he thought Mr. Kennedy was arrived, as there was a black on shore with a shirt on and trousers.  On going upon deck, the Captain had left in the dinghy for the mainland, where the black was standing, I observed with the glass and the naked eye, the black first standing, then walking very lame, then sitting down on a rock on the mainland.  The dinghy made there, and took him on board.  It turned out to be Jackey, of Mr. Kennedy’s party, who looked very haggard and told a woeful tale.  After being on board I wished to take down depositions, fearing anything might happen to him from over-excitement.  Depositions were taken, before which he became faint, and a glass of wine revived him, which he told us afterwards, made him budgeree (that is, well again.) I consulted with the Captain as to what should be done, and it was immediately determined upon to leave Port Albany with all possible speed, to save the surviving parties at Pudding-pan Hill and Weymouth Bay, three men at the former place, and the rest at the latter.  It being necessary to take the sheep with us, they were all but three shipped in the evening, and prompt orders given for the vessel to be got ready for a start in the morning the first thing.  In the meantime I went on shore with the Captain to get the bullock in to kill, Barrett, as well, on horseback, and we found it was impossible to get him in—­he was so wild:  he was therefore shot at the far and south end of the island, with the intention of bringing as much as possible of the carcass away.  It getting late in the evening, however, none was taken away, nor is there time now to do so, and to do also an act of duty and humanity to the yet living human beings.

Sunday, 24th December.

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Project Gutenberg
Narrative of the Voyage of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By the Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During the Years 1846-1850. from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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