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Robert Kerr (writer)
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 656 pages of information about A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels Volume 04.

Chap.  VII.  Continuation of the early history of Peru, after the death of Francisco Pizarro, to the defeat of Gonzalo Pizarro, and the re-establishment of tranquillity in the country; written by Augustino Zarate.

Sect
  I. From the revival of the civil wars in Peru, to the close of the
  administration of Vaca de Castro, the first governor appointed from
  Spain.

  II.  Commencement of the Viceroyalty of Blasco Nunnez Vela, and renewal
  of the civil war in Peru by the usurpation of Gonzalo Pizarro.

[Illustration:  Viceroyalty of Mexico Published 1 Jan’y 1812 by W’m Blackwood Edin’r.]

A GENERAL HISTORY AND COLLECTION OF VOYAGES AND TRAVELS.

PART II.

BOOK II.  CONTINUED.

* * * * *

CHAPTER V.

History of the discovery and conquest of Mexico, written in the year 1568, by captain Bernal Diaz del Castillo, one of the conquerors.—­Continued.

SECTION VI.

The Spaniards commence their March to Mexico; with an account of the War in Tlascala, and the submission of that Nation.

Everything being in readiness for our march to Mexico, we were advised by our allies of Chempoalla to proceed by way of Tlascala, the inhabitants of that province being in friendship with them and constantly at war with the Mexicans; and at our requisition, we were joined by fifty of the principal warriors of the Totanacas[1], who likewise gave us 200 tlamama, or men of burden, to draw our guns and to transport our baggage and ammunition[2].  Our first day’s march on the 16th of August 1519, was to Xalapan, and our second to Socochima, a place of difficult approach, surrounded by vines.  During the whole of this march, the main body was kept in compact order, being always preceded by an advance of light infantry, and patroles of cavalry.  Our interpreters informed the people of this place, that we were subjects of the great emperor Don Carlos, who had sent us to abolish human sacrifices and various other abuses; and as these people were allies of Chempoalla and independent of Montezuma, they treated us in a friendly manner.  We erected a cross at this place, explaining its signification and giving them information of many things belonging to our holy faith, and exhorting them to reverence the cross.  From this place we proceeded by a difficult pass among lofty mountains to Texotla, the people of which place were well disposed to us, as they also paid no tribute to Montezuma.  Continuing our march through desert lofty mountains, we experienced excessive cold, with heavy falls of hail, and came

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