The Deacon of Dobbinsville eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 65 pages of information about The Deacon of Dobbinsville.

Title:  The Deacon of Dobbinsville A Story Based on Actual Happenings

Author:  John A. Morrison

Release Date:  June 4, 2004 [EBook #12512]

Language:  English

Character set encoding:  ASCII

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THE DEACON OF DOBBINSVILLE

A Story Based on Actual Happenings

By John A. Morrison

Publisher’s Preface

This narrative, written and first printed some 45 or 50 years ago, depicts the contrast in that day between the nominal religious professors on the one hand, and on the other the individuals who had been soundly converted, made new creatures in Christ, filled with the Holy Spirit and rejoicing on the “highway of holiness.”  There is a distinct line of demarcation “between him that serveth God and him that serveth him not.”

The Apostle Paul warned:  “For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears; and they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables.” 2 Tim. 4:4, 5.  The religious world has apostatized much more since Paul’s day, even to the extent in this modern age that professors of Christianity are proclaiming the blasphemous “God is dead” philosophy.

The author, John Arch Morrison, kindly granted this publisher his permission to reprint this book.  Here are his words in his own handwriting dated October 26, 1965:  “Dear Bro. in Christ, I have no objection to you printing any number of ‘The Deacon of Dobbinsville.’  Cordially, John A. Morrison.”

Then hardly two months later, on December 23, 1965, and before this book was printed, the author was taken suddenly from this life by a heart attack at Anderson, Indiana in his 73rd year.

Time is rapidly bearing us all on to eternity.  How all-important it is that we remember constantly the words of the Psalmist:  “So teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.”  The Wise Man writes:  “Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter:  Fear God, and keep his commandments:  for this is the whole duty of man.”  Eccl. 12:13.

March, 1966—­Lawrence D. Pruitt, Publisher

The Deacon of Dobbinsville

By John A. Morrison

CHAPTER I

Mount Olivet church at the time of which I am about to write had received the zenith of her glory.  She was possessed of a full measure of the denominational pride and prejudice common to the day and the community in which she existed.  Since Mount Olivet church is to occupy so conspicuous a place in my narrative, it is fitting that I should take time and space right here to describe her.  I must also give my readers an idea of the community of which Mount Olivet church formed the hub and center.

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The Deacon of Dobbinsville from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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