Bataille de dames eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 95 pages of information about Bataille de dames.

#Page 43.#

[Footnote 115:  #original#, queer, “a strange coincidence.”  Not “original” (originel), Cp. p. 34, note 2.]

ACT II.  SCENE 8.

[Footnote 116:  #Que de#, How many.—­#a#, i.e., I ought to.—­#me valoir#, gain for me.]

[Footnote 117:  #de plus longue date#, for longer, since a longer time.]

[Footnote 118:  #a titre d’#, because you were an, here.]

#Page 44.#

[Footnote 119:  The countess says that she will place him under such obligations as to make any adequate return difficult, but she means to convey to the audience the malicious implication that she will make it hard (#difficile#) for him to feel any gratitude to her at all.]

[Footnote 120:  #Sa Majeste#, i.e., Louis XVIII.  Note the gender.]

#Page 45.#

[Footnote 121:  #c’en est fait#, it’s all over with that.]

[Footnote 122:  #Horace#, Horatius, the hero of Corneille’s tragedy Horace, one of three brothers who fought for Rome against the Alban brothers Curiatii, who were their relatives by marriage.  In speaking to his brother-in-law of the approaching fight Horace uses the words (Act II., Scene 3): 

    Albe vous a nomme, je ne vous connais plus,

a verse which is here parodied.  For the story of the Horatii, see any classical dictionary.]

[Footnote 123:  #un peu long# because its former half has, when pronounced according to the rules of French prosody, seven syllables, while an alexandrine hemistich should have but six, as this will have if bonapartiste is spoken without the final e.]

[Footnote 124:  #Corneille# (1606-1684) was the first of the great French classical dramatists, and in the opinion of many the greatest French tragic poet.]

[Footnote 125:  #Ah! ca#, By the way.  Cp. p. 16, note 2.]

#Page 46.#

[Footnote 126:  #inqualifiable#, unspeakable.—­#sanglante#, outrageous.  Both adjectives are too strong to accord with the rest of the scene.]

[Footnote 127:  Attend to your duties and go.]

[Footnote 128:  The year indicated is 1799, when the Vendeeans had been excited by English emissaries to a revolt from their temporary submission to General Hoche in 1795.  But this does not agree with the statement of p. 47, line 32.]

[Footnote 129:  #procureur#, prosecuting officer, who combined the functions of the modern procureur and the juge d’instruction,—­functions that have nothing corresponding to them in English justice or in American procedure.]

#Page 47.#

[Footnote 130:  #a ma barbe#, “under my nose,” “before my very eyes.”]

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Bataille de dames from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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