Bataille de dames eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 95 pages of information about Bataille de dames.

#Page 30.#

[Footnote 88:  #quel bonheur#, how fortunate, i.e., for me.]

#Page 31.#

[Footnote 89:  #brigadier#, sergeant.—­#expres#, messenger.]

[Footnote 90:  #tiens a#, desire to.]

#Page 32.#

[Footnote 91:  #n’assistiez seulement pas#, were not even present.]

[Footnote 92:  #duo#, duet.  Italian.]

#Page 33.#

[Footnote 93:  #brava#, good.  Feminine of the Italian bravo.  This grammatical accuracy shows good breeding.]

#Page 34.#

[Footnote 94:  #cadette#, younger.  Properly of sisters, but see dictionary.]

[Footnote 95:  #original#, curious, queer, “peculiar.”  Distinguish from originel, “original.”]

[Footnote 96:  #cantabile# (sound the e-final), piece of vocal music.  Italian.]

#Page 35.#

[Footnote 97:  #incultes#, uncultivated in musical matters.]

[Footnote 98:  #gauche#, embarrassed, rather than “awkward.”]

[Footnote 99:  #tenait de#, had a sort of.]

#Page 36.#

[Footnote 100:  #arbre fortune#, i.e., the orange-tree.]

[Footnote 101:  #ses yeux ... a lui#, his eyes—­you know whom I mean.]

#Page 37.#

[Footnote 102:  #effacees#, drawn back and down so as to set off the corsage.]

[Footnote 103:  #Que trop#, Only too charming.]

#Page 38.#

[Footnote 104:  #depare#.  Note the play on #parer#, and compare the English saying:  Beauty when unadorned is most adorned.]

[Footnote 105:  #rester court#, stop short from embarrassment.]

[Footnote 106:  #J’y suis#, I have it, i.e., know what I will do.]

ACT II.  SCENE 4.

#Page 39.#

[Footnote 107:  #traversent#, cross over.  A figure in the quadrille.]

ACT II.  SCENE 6.

#Page 40.#

[Footnote 108:  #a en etre#, have a part in it.]

[Footnote 109:  #Toujours du roman#, You are always a little romantic in your ideas.]

#Page 41.#

[Footnote 110:  #m’en defendre#, help it.]

[Footnote 111:  #Qu’ ... belle#, How beautiful.  Though this use of que is very common, it often puzzles beginners.]

[Footnote 112:  #vienne la sentence#, let the sentence come.  Optative.]

[Footnote 113:  #madrigaux#, pretty speeches; properly “madrigals,” or love-songs, in the artificial pastoral manner.  Originally a form of musical composition.]

#Page 42.#

[Footnote 114:  #desinteressement#, unselfish devotion.  This speech is a good example of what the French call blague,—­a sort of light-hearted mockery of moral ideals.  See my note to “Le Gendre de monsieur Poirier,” p. 5, note 7.]

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Bataille de dames from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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