The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave Trade by the British Parliament (1808), Volume I eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 384 pages of information about The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave Trade by the British Parliament (1808), Volume I.

It was now necessary that I should write to the commitee in London.  I had written to them only two letters, during my absence; for I had devoted myself so much to the great object I had undertaken, that I could think of little else.  Hence some of my friends among them were obliged to write to different persons at Bristol, to inquire if I was alive.  I gave up a day or two, therefore, to this purpose.  I informed the commitee of all my discoveries in the various branches to which my attention had been directed, and desired them in return to procure me various official documents for the port of London, which I then specified.  Having done this, I conferred with Mr. Falconbridge, relative to being with me at Liverpool.  I thought it right to make him no other offer than that his expenses should be paid.  He acceded to my request on these disinterested terms; and I took my departure from Bristol, leaving him to follow me in a few days.

CHAPTER XVII.

Author secures the Glocester paper, and lays the foundation of a petition from that city—­does the same at Worcester—­and at Chester—­arrives at Liverpool—­collects specimens of African produce—­also imports and exports—­and muster-rolls—­and accounts of dock-duties—­and iron instruments used in the Slave-trade—­His introduction to Mr. Norris, and others—­Author and his errand become known—­People visit him out of curiosity—­Frequent controversies on the subject of the Slave-trade.

On my arrival at Glocester, I waited upon my friend Dean Tucker.  He was pleased to hear of the great progress I had made since he left me.  On communicating to him my intention of making interest with the editors of some provincial papers, to enlighten the public mind, and with the inhabitants of some respectable places, for petitions to Parliament, relative to the abolition of the Slave-trade, he approved of it, and introduced me to Mr. Raikes, the proprietor of the respectable paper belonging to that city.  Mr. Raikes acknowledged, without any hesitation, the pleasure he should have in serving such a noble cause; and he promised to grant me, from time to time, a corner in his paper, for such things as I might point out to him for insertion.  This promise he performed afterwards, without any pecuniary consideration, and solely on the ground of benevolence.  He promised also his assistance as to the other object, for the promotion of which I left him several of my Summary Views to distribute.

At Worcester I trod over the same ground, and with the same success.  Timothy Bevington, of the religious society of the Quakers, was the only person to whom I had an introduction there.  He accompanied me to the mayor, to the editor of the Worcester paper, and to several others, before each of whom I pleaded the cause of the oppressed Africans in the best manner I was able.  I dilated both on the inhumanity and on the impolicy of the trade, which I supported

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave Trade by the British Parliament (1808), Volume I from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook