The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave Trade by the British Parliament (1808), Volume I eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 384 pages of information about The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave Trade by the British Parliament (1808), Volume I.

[Footnote A:  The seamen of the Alfred informed the purser of their ill usage.  Matthew Pyke not only showed him his arm and his back, but acquainted him with the murder of Charles Horseler, stating that he had the instrument of his death in his possession.  The purser seemed more alive to this than to any other circumstance, and wished to get it from him.  Pyke, however, had given it to me.  Now what will the reader think, when he is informed that the purser, after all this knowledge of the captain’s cruelty, sent him out again, and that he was the same person, who was purser of the Brothers, and who had also sent out the captain of that ship a second time, as has been related, notwithstanding his barbarities in former voyages!!]

This advice, though it was judicious, and founded on a knowledge of Law-proceedings, I found it very difficult to adopt.  My own disposition was naturally such, that whatever I engaged in I followed with more than ordinary warmth.  I could not be supposed therefore, affected and interested as I then was, to be cool and tranquil on this occasion.  And yet what would my worthy friend have said, if in this first instance I had opposed him?  I had a very severe struggle in my own feelings on this account.  At length, though reluctantly, I obeyed.  But as the passions, which agitate the human mind, when it is greatly inflamed, must have a vent somewhere, or must work off as it were, or in working together must produce some new passion or effect; so I found the rage, which had been kindling within me, subsiding into the most determined resolutions of future increased activity and perseverance.  I began now to think that the day was not long enough for me to labour in.  I regretted often the approach of night, which suspended my work, and I often welcomed that of the morning, which restored me to it.  When I felt myself weary, I became refreshed by the thought of what I was doing; when disconsolate, I was comforted by it.  I lived in hope that every day’s labour would furnish me with that knowledge, which would bring this evil nearer to its end; and I worked on, under these feelings, regarding neither trouble nor danger in the pursuit.

CHAPTER XV.

Author confers with the inhabitants of Bridgewater relative to a petition to parliament in behalf of the abolition—­returns to Bristol—­discovers a scandalous mode of procuring seamen for the Slave-trade—­and of paying them—­makes a comparative view of their loss in this and in other trades—­procures imports and exports—­examines the construction and admeasurement of Slave-ships—­of the Fly and Neptune—­Difficulty of procuring evidence—­Case of Gardiner of the Pilgrim—­of Arnold of the Ruby—­some particulars of the latter in his former voyages.

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The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave Trade by the British Parliament (1808), Volume I from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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