The Making of Religion eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 351 pages of information about The Making of Religion.

[Footnote 15:  Waitz, Anthropologie, ii. 167.]

[Footnote 16:  Waitz and Gerland, Anthropologie, vi. 796-799 and 809.  In 1874 Mr. Howitt’s evidence on the moral element in the mysteries was not published.  Waitz scouts the idea that the higher Australian beliefs are of European origin.  ’Wir schen vielmehr uralte Truemmer aehnlicher Mythologenie in ihnen,’ (vi. 798) flotsam from ideas of immemorial antiquity.]

[Footnote 17:  Wilson, p. 209.]

[Footnote 18:  Wilson, p. 392.]

[Footnote 19:  Park’s Journey, i. 274, 275, 1815.]

[Footnote 20:  P. 245.]

[Footnote 21:  London, 1887.]

[Footnote 22:  Ellis, pp. 20, 21.]

[Footnote 23:  P. 4.]

[Footnote 24:  Ellis, p. 10.]

[Footnote 25:  P. 120.]

[Footnote 26:  P. 15.]

[Footnote 27:  P. 125.]

[Footnote 28:  Ellis, pp. 24, 25.]

[Footnote 29:  Ellis, p. 189.]

[Footnote 30:  Miss Kingsley, p. 442.]

[Footnote 31:  Ellis, p. 229.]

[Footnote 32:  Ibid. p. 25.]

[Footnote 33:  Op. cit. p. 27.]

[Footnote 34:  Ellis, p. 29.]

[Footnote 35:  Op. cit. p. 28.]

[Footnote 36:  ‘African Religion and Law,’ National Review, September 1897, p. 132.]

XIV

AHONE.  TI-RA-WA.  NA-PI.  PACHACAMAC.  TUI LAGA.  TAA-ROA

In this chapter it is my object to set certain American Creators beside the African beings whom we have been examining.  We shall range from Hurons to Pawnees and Blackfeet, and end with Pachacamac, the supreme being of the old Inca civilisation, with Tui Laga and Taa-roa.  It will be seen that the Hurons have been accidentally deprived of their benevolent Creator by a bibliographical accident, while that Creator corresponds very well with the Peruvian Pachucamac, often regarded as a mere philosophical abstraction.  The Pawnees will show us a Creator involved in a sacrificial ritual, which is not common, while the Blackfeet present a Creator who is not envisaged as a spirit at all, and, on our theory, represents a very early stage of the theistic conception.

To continue the argument from analogy against Major Ellis’s theory of the European origin of Nyankupon, it seems desirable first to produce a parallel to his case, and to that of his blood-stained subordinate deity, Bobowissi, from a quarter where European influence is absolutely out of the question.  Virginia was first permanently colonised by Englishmen in 1607, and the ‘Historie of Travaile into Virginia,’ by William Strachey, Gent., first Secretary of the Colony, dates from the earliest years (1612-1616).  It will hardly be suggested, then, that the natives had already adopted our Supreme Being, especially as Strachey says that the native priests strenuously opposed the Christian God.  Strachey found a house-inhabiting,

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