The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 521 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 2.
by beating of large drums.  The encounter then that took place between the Ten-necked Rakshasa and that prince of Raghu’s race, was fierce in the extreme.  Indeed, that combat between them hath no parallel elsewhere.  And the Rakshasa hurled at Rama a terrible javelin looking like Indra’s thunderbolt and resembling a Brahmana’s curse on the point of utterance.[63] Rama, however, quickly cut into fragments that javelin by means of his sharp arrows.  And beholding that most difficult feat, Ravana was struck with fear.  But soon his wrath was excited and the Ten-necked hero began to shower on Rama whetted arrows by thousands and tens of thousands and countless weapons of various kinds, such as rockets and javelins and maces and battle-axes and darts of various kinds and Shataghnis and whetted shafts.  And beholding that terrible form of illusion displayed by the Ten-necked Rakshasa, the monkeys fled in fear in all directions.  Then the descendant of Kakutstha, taking out of his quiver an excellent arrow furnished with handsome wings and golden feathers and a bright and beautiful head, fixed it on the bow with Brahmasira mantra.  And beholding that excellent arrow transformed by Rama, with proper mantras into a Brahma weapon, the celestials and the Gandharvas with Indra at their head, began to rejoice.  And the gods and the Danavas and the Kinnaras were led by the display of that Brahma weapon to regard the life of their Rakshasa foe almost closed.  Then Rama shot that terrible weapon of unrivalled energy, destined to compass Ravana’s death, and resembling the curse of a Brahmana on the point of utterance.  And as soon, O Bharata, as that arrow was shot by Rama from his bow drawn to a circle, the Rakshasa king with his chariot and charioteer and horses blazed up, surrounded on all sides by a terrific fire.  And beholding Ravana slain by Rama of famous achievements, the celestials, with the Gandharvas and the Charanas, rejoiced exceedingly.  And deprived of universal dominion by the energy of the Brahma weapon, the five elements forsook the illustrious Ravana, and were consumed by the Brahma weapon, the physical ingredients of Ravana’s body.  His flesh and blood were all reduced to nothingness,—­so that the ashes even could not be seen.’”

[63] According to both Vyasa and Valmiki, there is nothing so fierce as a Brahmana’s curse.  The very thunderbolt of Indra is weak compared to a Brahmana’s curse.  The reason is obvious.  The thunder smites the individual at whom it may be aimed.  The curse of Brahmana smites the whole race, whole generation, whole country.

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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