Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 521 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 2.

SECTION CLII

Vaisampayana said, “Having reached that spot, Bhimasena saw in the vicinity of the Kailasa cliff, that beautiful lotus lake surrounded by lovely woods, and guarded by the Rakshasas.  And it sprang from the cascades contiguous to the abode of Kuvera.  And it was beautiful to behold, and was furnished with a wide-spreading shade and abounded in various trees and creepers and was covered with green lilies.  And this unearthly lake was filled with golden lotuses, and swarmed with diverse species of birds.  And its banks were beautiful and devoid of mud.  And situated on the rocky elevation this expanse of excellent water was exceedingly fair.  And it was the wonder of the world and healthful and of romantic sight.  In that lake the son of Kunti saw, the water of ambrosial taste and cool and light and clear and fresh; and the Pandava drank of it profusely.  And that unearthly receptacle of waters was covered with celestial Saugandhika lotuses, and was also spread over with beautiful variegated golden lotuses of excellent fragrance having graceful stalks of lapis lazulis.  And swayed by swans and Karandavas, these lotuses were scattering fresh farina.  And this lake was the sporting region of the high-souled Kuvera, the king of the Yakshas.  And it was held in high regard by the Gandharvas, the Apsaras and the celestials.  And it was frequented by the celestial sages and the Yakshas and the Kimpurushas and the Rakshasas and the Kinnaras; and it was well-protected by Kuvera.  And as soon as he beheld that river and that unearthly lake, Kunti’s son, Bhimasena of mighty strength became exceedingly delighted.  And agreeably to the mandate of their king, hundreds and thousands of Rakshasas, named Krodhavasas, were guarding that lake, wearing uniforms and armed with various weapons.  And as that repressor of foes, Kunti’s son, the heroic Bhima of dreadful prowess, clad in deer-skins and wearing golden armlets and equipped with weapons and girding his sword on, was fearlessly proceeding, with the view of gathering the lotus, those (Rakshasas) saw him and immediately began to address each other, shouting forth, ’It behoveth you to enquire for the errand on which this foremost of men, clad in deer skins, and equipped with arms, hath come.’  Then they all approached the effulgent Vrikodara of mighty arms and asked, ’Who art thou?  Thou shouldst answer our questions.  We see thee in the guise of an ascetic and yet armed with weapons.  O thou of mighty intelligence, do thou unfold unto us the object with which thou hast come (hither).’”

SECTION CLIII

Follow Us on Facebook